Twelve family dogs underwent a test as described in Mongillo et al. [Animal Behavior, 2010, 80:1057-1063], which involves the simultaneous presentation of two stimuli. In the present study, the test was run with three different pairs of stimuli: two strangers (SS); two strangers, one of which visibly carrying the dog’s leash (SL); a stranger and the owner (SO). Moreover, a fourth test was run with the owner as the only stimulus present (O). The results suggest that dogs give preferential attention to social and non-social relevant stimuli, although social ones are more effective in eliciting a preferential response. Moreover, attention to relevant social stimuli seems scarcely affected by the presence of distractors.

Attention to social and non-social stimuliin family dogs

MONGILLO, PAOLO;PITTERI, ELISA;ADAMELLI, SERENA;MARINELLI, LIETA
2012

Abstract

Twelve family dogs underwent a test as described in Mongillo et al. [Animal Behavior, 2010, 80:1057-1063], which involves the simultaneous presentation of two stimuli. In the present study, the test was run with three different pairs of stimuli: two strangers (SS); two strangers, one of which visibly carrying the dog’s leash (SL); a stranger and the owner (SO). Moreover, a fourth test was run with the owner as the only stimulus present (O). The results suggest that dogs give preferential attention to social and non-social relevant stimuli, although social ones are more effective in eliciting a preferential response. Moreover, attention to relevant social stimuli seems scarcely affected by the presence of distractors.
3rd CANINE SCIENCE FORUM
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2525315
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