Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. are zoonotic bacteria, commonly harboured in the enteric tract of several avian species. A survey was attempted to verify the presence of these microorganisms in birds of prey (i.e. Accipitriformes, Falconiformes, Strigiformes) reared for falconry in Veneto region (Italy). Seventy-four individuals were tested for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Cloacal swabs were collected and analysed by microbiological procedures in order to identify the presence of the two bacteria. Multiplex PCR (Campylobacter spp.) and serotyping (Salmonella spp.) were used to identify isolates. Six C. jejuni and 1 S. Livingstone were isolated from 2 Buteo regalis, 2 Parabuteo unicinctus, 1 Falco peregrinus and 1 Strix aluco, and 1 Falco peregrinus, respectively. Results of this study suggest that these microorganisms are occasionally harboured in the digestive tract of birds of prey. However, as potential reservoir of zoonotic bacteria, raptors living in close contact with humans should be monitored in order to preserve human health.

Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. in birds of prey.

C. De Luca;G. Niero;A. Piccirillo
2017

Abstract

Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. are zoonotic bacteria, commonly harboured in the enteric tract of several avian species. A survey was attempted to verify the presence of these microorganisms in birds of prey (i.e. Accipitriformes, Falconiformes, Strigiformes) reared for falconry in Veneto region (Italy). Seventy-four individuals were tested for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Cloacal swabs were collected and analysed by microbiological procedures in order to identify the presence of the two bacteria. Multiplex PCR (Campylobacter spp.) and serotyping (Salmonella spp.) were used to identify isolates. Six C. jejuni and 1 S. Livingstone were isolated from 2 Buteo regalis, 2 Parabuteo unicinctus, 1 Falco peregrinus and 1 Strix aluco, and 1 Falco peregrinus, respectively. Results of this study suggest that these microorganisms are occasionally harboured in the digestive tract of birds of prey. However, as potential reservoir of zoonotic bacteria, raptors living in close contact with humans should be monitored in order to preserve human health.
Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Avian, Herpetological and Exotic Mammal Medicine (3rd ICARE)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3248604
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