To conclude, we wish to recall the responsibilities of professionals involved in developing doctoral programs in the field of career guidance and counseling. To date, a low investment in this field appears the norm in higher education. In fact, universities frequently offer a limited number of career counseling courses (if at all!) that are frequently taught by professors who lack career counseling training or do not work in the field, while many doctoral programs do not offer advanced career counseling courses (Savickas, Van Esbroeck, & Herr, 2005). On the contrary, organizations of professionals such as the National Career Development Association (NCDA) and the European Society for Vocational Designing and Career Counseling (ESVDC) value career counseling and guidance education and provide specific training recommendations, promote mobility exchanges, and issue awards to professors and doctoral students for their contributions to the field. We are convinced that professionals involved in preparing future career guidance and counseling programs should be aware of their different roles and impacts on several aspects of doctoral curricula. They should be ready to support the growth of their doctoral students by offering them supervision, mentoring, and coaching, as well as exploring new learning opportunities to help their students develop a professional identity (Limberg et al., 2013), in this case as scientists. This includes promoting international exchanges and collaborations, such as attending ECADOC summer schools, where the experience of openness to others and to change could lead participants to make their own changes, including adopting new points of view, reconsidering their choice of research project, and introducing new research questions or methodologies. At the same time professionals in this field should continue to advocate for career and guidance counseling with their colleagues and with the general public (Lara, Kline, & Paulson, 2011).

Training for Career Guidance and Counseling Academic Scientists: Future Challenges and Directions

Lea Ferrari;Teresa Maria Sgaramella;Salvatore Soresi
2018

Abstract

To conclude, we wish to recall the responsibilities of professionals involved in developing doctoral programs in the field of career guidance and counseling. To date, a low investment in this field appears the norm in higher education. In fact, universities frequently offer a limited number of career counseling courses (if at all!) that are frequently taught by professors who lack career counseling training or do not work in the field, while many doctoral programs do not offer advanced career counseling courses (Savickas, Van Esbroeck, & Herr, 2005). On the contrary, organizations of professionals such as the National Career Development Association (NCDA) and the European Society for Vocational Designing and Career Counseling (ESVDC) value career counseling and guidance education and provide specific training recommendations, promote mobility exchanges, and issue awards to professors and doctoral students for their contributions to the field. We are convinced that professionals involved in preparing future career guidance and counseling programs should be aware of their different roles and impacts on several aspects of doctoral curricula. They should be ready to support the growth of their doctoral students by offering them supervision, mentoring, and coaching, as well as exploring new learning opportunities to help their students develop a professional identity (Limberg et al., 2013), in this case as scientists. This includes promoting international exchanges and collaborations, such as attending ECADOC summer schools, where the experience of openness to others and to change could lead participants to make their own changes, including adopting new points of view, reconsidering their choice of research project, and introducing new research questions or methodologies. At the same time professionals in this field should continue to advocate for career and guidance counseling with their colleagues and with the general public (Lara, Kline, & Paulson, 2011).
2018
New Perspectives on Career Counseling and Guidance in Europe
978-3-319-61475-5
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3250394
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