Controlling processes by electrochemical means is increasingly attracting the attention of organic and polymer chemists. Electrochemistry provides tunable parameters without requiring the addition of external compounds, often increasing system tolerance to impurities, thus facilitating reaction handling and switching among different stages. In the last decades, the main interest in polymer chemistry concerned the preparation of predetermined macromolecular architectures. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is the most powerful and versatile method to build well-defined polymers, with narrow molecular-weight distribution and excellent retention of chain-end functionalities. ATRP is based on the reversible deactivation of propagating radicals, such as to extend the lifetime of polymer chains. Radical concentration in solution is always very low, ultimately minimizing their probability of terminating. The activation-deactivation equilibrium is generally governed by a metal catalyst, composed by copper and a polydentate amine ligand. The active form of the catalyst, [CuIL]+, generates radicals by reductive cleavage of the C–X bond in the alkyl halide initiator, RX. As a consequence of the electron transfer and the concurrent atom transfer, the deactivator [X–CuIIL]+ is formed. Generated radicals add to few monomer molecules (i.e. propagation reaction), then they are reverted to their dormant state by reacting with [X–CuIIL]+. Importantly, RX initiators should be highly reactive, as to ensure the simultaneous growth of all polymer chains, thereby targeting pre-determined molecular weights. Chain-end functionalities are preserved during the polymerization, thus enabling several post-polymerization processes and the building of copolymers with various compositions and topologies. The aim of this thesis is to affirm electrochemical tools as a primary, effective and accessible source for ATRP triggering and mechanistic analysis. Less than 20 years ago, electrochemistry was involved for the first time in ATRP, when standard reduction potentials of some common catalysts were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and correlated to their catalytic performances. Since then, CV is a well-established technique to study the redox properties of ATRP catalysts and the relative affinity of CuI and CuII species for halide ions, hence predicting their activity in the polymerization. Moreover, many electrochemical procedures were arranged for the precise measurement of the activation rate constant, kact, which concerns the reaction between [CuIL]+ and RX. kact values spanning over a range of 12 orders of magnitude were measured with different techniques, in many environments. Among these techniques, the use of a rotating disk electrode allowed a fast, easy and highly reproducible measurement. This instrument was further exploited in this thesis work to set up a facile electrochemical procedure for the determination of the thermodynamic equilibrium constant of ATRP, KATRP. Essentially, the reaction between CuI species and RX was followed as for kact determination, but in the absence of a radical scavenger that had been used to kinetically isolate the activation step. The interplay between activation, deactivation and radical termination was monitored, and KATRP was obtained by elaborating the electrochemical response through an equation proposed by Fischer and recently slightly modified. The method was applied to different Cu catalysts, initiators, solvent/monomer combinations and temperatures, observing some trends in accordance with general ATRP understanding. Both kact and KATRP must be measured in the absence of halide ions, which strongly affect the speciation of CuI. Indeed, the amount of active [CuIL]+ is reduced by the formation of various halogenated CuI species, thus slowing down the reaction with RX. However, the drop in the rate of CuI consumption in the presence of different C_(X^- ) was used to estimate the association constant of X− to [CuIL]+ (i.e. CuI halidophilicity constant, K_X^I). A procedure to measure K_X^I from K_ATRP^app, obtained under various C_(X^- ), was reported and verified for an independently determined K_X^I value. Electrochemistry is not only used to study ATRP mechanism, but also to effectively trigger the polymerization process. In fact, an applied current or potential is used to re-generate CuI from [X–CuIIL]+, which accumulates in solution because of termination events. Electrochemically mediated ATRP (eATRP) uses electrons as a reducing agent, thus it is free of by-products and allows to start from a minimum amount of air-stable CuII, which is reduced in situ. Nonetheless, the traditional eATRP setup required a potentiostat and expensive Platinum electrodes. During my Ph.D., I tried to simplify the setup as to make eATRP a cost-effective and scalable technique. Various inexpensive and easily functionalizable materials were successfully used as cathodes for eATRP in both organic and aqueous media. These working electrodes allowed well-controlled polymerizations even under galvanostatic conditions (i.e. constant current steps), which permitted the use of two, instead of three electrodes, and the replacement of the potentiostat with a common current generator. Furthermore, these cathodes were coupled to a sacrificial Aluminum anode in a completely Pt-free setup. Finally, these materials did not release metal ions in solution during the polymerization, and their morphology was not modified, thus they could be re-used in consecutive experiments. One important feature of eATRP and ATRP in general is their high versatility. Actually, various types of monomers are suitable for these techniques. Instead, controlled polymerization of acidic monomers via ATRP was considered impossible until very recently. In 2016, Fantin at al. proved that growing chains of poly(methacrylic acid) in ATRP were affected by a cyclization reaction with loss of C-X functionalities, i.e. termination. Suitable conditions to overcome this issue were proposed and successful eATRPs of methacrylic acid were reported. This important achievement was extended to acrylic acid (AA), which is a biocompatible, largely used monomer. In this thesis, it is proved that AA polymerization was hampered by the same cyclization side reaction during eATRP. Indeed, some conditions that were suitable for methacrylic acid were successfully adapted to eATRP of AA. i) Chloride ions replaced bromides, and ii) polymerization rate was enhanced by using a cathode with large surface area, applying a strongly negative potential, compared to Eѳ of the catalyst, and optimizing the amount and the nature of other reactants. One way to broaden the applicability of ATRP is to design new ligands able to convey particular features to Cu catalysts. Herein, 4 new ligands are presented, in which the skeleton of the traditionally used tris(2-methylpyridyl)amine (TPMA) was modified with m-functionalized phenyl substituents. Electrochemical characterizations of Cu complexes with these ligands allowed to predict a lower activity toward RX, compared to parent TPMA, which was proved by kact determination. Nevertheless, these complexes were used to catalyze well-controlled eATRPs of methyl methacrylate in DMF, and oligo (ethyleneoxide) methyl ether methacrylate and methacrylic acid in water. Despite the low activity, these compounds were very stable even at acidic pH and can be used to tune the polymerization in extremely reactive system. The versatility of ATRP is also reflected by the application in different environments. Ionic liquids for example are attracting great interest as green solvents for polymerizations. In 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate, the redox properties of common ATRP catalysts and initiators were investigated by CV, whereas kinetic studies were performed via rotating disk electrode. This work proved that the behavior of Cu complexes and RX in ILs is similar to the one observed in traditional organic solvents. Therefore, ILs are suitable media for controlled polymerizations, and particularly they should be applied as solvent for eATRP because they are sufficiently conductive without added supporting electrolytes. Dispersed media represent another eco-friendly environment for polymerizations. Although many industrial processes are based on (mini)emulsion systems, the vast majority of literature reports on ATRP concerns experiments in homogeneous solutions. ATRP in miniemulsion required the design of super hydrophobic catalysts that remained confined into hydrophobic droplets, whereby tuning the polymerization. During my Ph.D., I spent six months as a visiting student at Carnegie Mellon University, in the laboratory of Prof. Matyjaszewski, who discovered ATRP in 1995. There, I had the opportunity to work on ATRP in miniemulsion and emulsion. A new catalytic system was arranged, and effectively applied to eATRP and activators re-generated by electron transfer (ARGET) ATRP, in which a reducing agent is added to continuously re-generate CuI species. Common hydrophilic catalysts were combined to inexpensive surfactants to form ion pairs able to enter the monomer droplets and catalyze the process. Electrochemical and spectrochemical characterizations proved the interactions between the compounds and defined the different contributions from ion-pair and interfacial catalysis. Block copolymers, polymer stars and brushes were easily synthetized with this approach. Moreover, residual copper in precipitated polymers was very low, even < 1 ppm, thus avoiding the need of further purifications. The system was then adapted to emulsion ARGET-ATRP, taking advantage of the water-solubility of the catalyst, which is a requirement of emulsion polymerizations, where the process should occur in the aqueous phase. By using suitable hydrophilic initiators and finely tuning the stirring rate and the pre-emulsification procedure, well controlled ab initio emulsion ARGET-ATRPs were obtained, even with low surfactant amounts.

La possibilità di controllare processi per via elettrochimica riveste crescente attenzione nel mondo della chimica organica e della sintesi di polimeri. L’elettrochimica offre diversi parametri per intervenire sulle proprietà dei sistemi in oggetto, senza introdurre altri agenti chimici e spesso aumentando la tolleranza del sistema verso le impurezze. Di conseguenza la gestione del processo e il passaggio tra diversi stadi risultano facilitati. Negli ultimi dieci anni, il principale interesse nel campo della sintesi polimerica riguarda la preparazione di macromolecole con architetture predeterminate. La polimerizzazione radicalica per trasferimento di atomo (ATRP) è la tecnica più versatile e affermata per la costruzione di polimeri ben definiti, con stretta distribuzione di pesi molecolari ed eccellente ritenzione di funzionalità di fine catena. L’ATRP si basa sulla disattivazione reversibile dei radicali propaganti, in modo da allungare il tempo di vita delle catene in crescita. La concentrazione di radicali in soluzione rimane sempre molto bassa, portando così a minimizzare la probabilità dei radicali stessi di essere soggetti a terminazione. L’equilibrio di attivazione-disattivazione è generalmente governato da un catalizzatore metallico, composto da un centro di rame e un legante amminico polidentato. Nella sua forma attiva, [CuIL]+, il catalizzatore genera radicali per rottura riduttiva del legame C–X nell’alogenuro alchilico, RX, utilizzato come iniziatore. La specie disattivante [X–CuIIL]+ si forma in seguito al trasferimento elettronico e atomico che avvengono in contemporanea. I radicali generati riescono ad addizionare solo poche molecole di monomero (reazione di propagazione), prima di essere riconvertiti al loro stato dormiente tramite reazione con [X–CuIIL]+. In ATRP è importante che gli iniziatori siano altamente reattivi, in modo da garantire la crescita simultanea di tutte le catene e quindi poter ottenere pesi molecolari predeterminati. Le funzionalità di fine catena non vengono intaccate durante la polimerizzazione e questo permette di sottoporre il polimero a processi di post-polimerizzazione e di costruire copolimeri con varie composizioni e topologie. Lo scopo di questa tesi di dottorato è quello di affermare l’elettrochimica come fondamentale, accessibile ed efficace risorsa per l’analisi meccanicistica dei processi di ATRP e anche per condurre questo tipo di polimerizzazioni. Meno di venti anni fa, studi elettrochimici furono per la prima volta utilizzati in ATRP: i potenziali standard di riduzione di alcuni catalizzatori comunemente usati furono determinati tramite voltammetria ciclica (CV) e correlati alle performances catalitiche di questi composti. Da allora, la CV è la tecnica per eccellenza per lo studio delle proprietà redox dei catalizzatori per ATRP, nonché per la determinazione delle affinità relative delle specie di CuI e CuII per gli ioni alogenuro, quindi per predire l’attività dei complessi nella polimerizzazione. Inoltre, diverse procedure elettrochimiche sono state messe a punto per misurare con elevata precisione la costante cinetica di attivazione, kact, che riguarda quindi la reazione tra [CuIL]+ e RX. Valori di kact che coprono 12 ordini di grandezza sono stati misurati con diverse tecniche, in vari ambienti. Tra le suddette tecniche, l’utilizzo di un elettrodo a disco rotante (RDE) consente misure rapide, facilmente realizzabili e altamente riproducibili. Il RDE è stato usato in questo lavoro di tesi per definire una semplice procedura elettrochimica per la determinazione della costante termodinamica di equilibrio di ATRP, KATRP. Sostanzialmente con questo strumento è stata seguita la reazione tra CuI e RX, come avveniva per la misura di kact, ma in questo caso non si è introdotto nel sistema un catturatore radicalico, che serviva per isolare cineticamente lo step di attivazione. Quindi le reazioni di attivazione, disattivazione e terminazione radicalica sono state contemporaneamente monitorate e il valore di KATRP è stato ottenuto dall’elaborazione del responso elettrochimico tramite un’equazione, originariamente proposta da Fischer e in seguito opportunamente modificata. Il metodo è stato applicato a diversi catalizzatori, iniziatori, combinazioni di solvente e monomero e temperature, osservando dei trends nelle costanti in accordo con i principi di ATRP. KATRP e kact devono essere determinate in assenza di ioni alogenuro, i quali influenzano fortemente la speciazione dei complessi di CuI. Infatti, la quantità della specie attiva [CuIL]+ viene diminuita a causa della formazione di specie di CuI variamente alogenate, di conseguenza la sua reazione con RX risulta rallentata. Dalla riduzione nella velocità con cui CuI viene consumato al variare di C_(X^- ) è stato possibile stimare la costante di associazione di X− a [CuIL] + (o alidofilicità di CuI, K_X^I). Viene quindi presentata una procedura per determinare K_X^I dai valori di K_ATRP^app, determinati via RDE in presenza di diverse concentrazioni di X−. Oltre a fornire strumenti per studi di tipo meccanicistico, l’elettrochimica viene usata anche come driving force del processo di polimerizzazione. Infatti, un potenziale o una corrente possono essere applicati al sistema per rigenerare la specie di CuI, da [X–CuIIL]+ che si accumula in seguito al verificarsi di reazioni di terminazione radicalica. La polimerizzazione radicalica per trasferimento di atomo mediata elettrochimicamente (eATRP) sfrutta gli elettroni come agenti riducenti, quindi non porta alla formazione di sottoprodotti e consente di usare come reagente un sale di CuII, stabile all’aria, che viene poi ridotto in situ. Il tradizionale setup per eATRP richiede però un potenziostato e costosi elettrodi di Platino. Durante il mio periodo di dottorato ho cercato di semplificare il setup di eATRP, così da rendere questa tecnica più conveniente e realizzabile su larga scala. Alcuni materiali non costosi e facilmente funzionalizzabili sono stati testati come catodi in solventi organici e in sistemi acquosi. Polimerizzazioni ben controllate sono state ottenute con gli elettrodi lavoranti analizzati, anche operando in modalità galvanostatica (i.e. applicando step a corrente costante), la quale consente di utilizzare due elettrodi anziché tre, e di sostituire il potenziostato con un semplice generatore di corrente. Inoltre, questi catodi hanno dato ottimi risultati anche in combinazione con un anodo sacrificale di Alluminio, quindi realizzando un setup completamente Pt-free. Infine, è stato dimostrato che questi materiali non rilasciano ioni metallici in soluzione e che la loro morfologia non viene modificata nel corso delle polimerizzazioni, pertanto possono essere riutilizzati in reazioni successive. Caratteristica distintiva dell’eATRP e della ATRP in generale è l’eccezionale versatilità di queste tecniche, che consentono di polimerizzare diverse tipologie di monomeri. Per molti anni però, fu ritenuto impossibile controllare la polimerizzazione di monomeri acidi via ATRP. Nel 2016, Fantin et al. hanno dimostrato che le catene propaganti di poli(acido metacrilico) tendono a ciclizzare, con conseguente perdita della funzionalità C–X, quindi terminazione. Una volta definite le condizioni adatte per evitare questa pericolosa reazione secondaria, è stato possibile controllare efficacemente la polimerizzazione dell’acido metacrilico tramite eATRP. Questa importante vittoria mi ha permesso di lavorare con successo alla polimerizzazione dell’acido acrilico (AA), monomero biocompatibile, usato in moltissimi settori. Innanzitutto è stato dimostrato che la propagazione di AA è affetta dalla stessa reazione parassita di ciclizzazione, quindi alcune delle condizioni che hanno permesso l’efficace eATRP dell’acido metacrilico, sono state adattate al sistema analizzato. i) Il sale bromurato è stato sostituito da un sale clorurato, ii) la velocità di polimerizzazione è stata massimizzata usando un elettrodo lavorante con elevata area superficiale, applicando un potenziale molto più negativo di quello standard di riduzione del catalizzatore e ottimizzando la composizione del sistema. Un modo efficace per aumentare l’applicabilità della ATRP consiste nella sintesi di nuovi leganti che conferiscano particolari proprietà al centro metallico. Nella tesi sono riportati 4 nuovi leganti, in cui lo scheletro del legante tris-2(metilpiridil)ammina (TPMA), comunemente usato in ATRP, è stato modificato con sostituenti fenilici variamente funzionalizzati in posizione meta. La caratterizzazione elettrochimica dei complessi di Cu con questi leganti ha portato a predire una minore attività rispetto al tradizionale Cu/TPMA. Questa è stata confermata dalla determinazione di kact tramite RDE. Ciononostante, questi complessi sono risultati efficaci catalizzatori in eATRP di metil metacrilato in DMF, e di oligo(etilene glicole)metil etere metacrilato e di acido metacrilico in acqua. Nonostante la non elevata attività, i complessi analizzati hanno mostrato buona stabilità in acqua, anche a pH acido, e si propongono come catalizzatori adeguati per sistemi altamente reattivi. La versatilità di queste polimerizzazioni si riflette nella possibilità di applicazione in un’ampia varietà di ambienti. Grande interesse, ad esempio, è rivolto all’utilizzo di Liquidi Ionici (ILs) come solventi di polimerizzazione “green”. Pertanto, le proprietà redox di alcuni catalizzatori e iniziatori, frequentemente usati in ATRP, sono state studiate tramite CV in 1-butil-3-metilimidazolio trifluorometansolfonato. Nello stesso sono stati effettuati studi cinetici via RDE. Queste analisi hanno permesso di affermare che il comportamento dei composti di Cu e degli alogenuri alchilici in IL è del tutto simile a quello osservato nei solventi organici tradizionali. Perciò, i liquidi ionici si confermano come solventi adatti a processi di polimerizzazione controllata. Appare infine auspicabile realizzare eATRP in ILs, perché la buona conducibilità elettrica di questi solventi consente di evitare l’aggiunta di un elettrolita di supporto. Un ulteriore ambiente sostenibile di polimerizzazione è rappresentato dai sistemi dispersi. Sebbene moltissime polimerizzazioni su scala industriale si basino su sistemi in (mini)emulsione, la maggior parte della letteratura che tratta di ATRP riporta processi in soluzione omogenea. La realizzazione di ATRP in miniemulsione ha richiesto la sintesi di opportuni leganti super-idrofobici, che consentissero di confinare il catalizzatore nella fase dispersa idrofobica, dove potesse esercitare il suo effetto. Durante il mio dottorato ho trascorso sei mesi come visiting student presso la Carnegie Mellon University, nei laboratorio del Prof. Matyjaszewski, che scoprì l’ATRP nel 1995. In quel periodo ho potuto lavorare estesamente su ATRP in miniemulsione ed emulsione. Un nuovo sistema catalitico è stato messo a punto e applicato con efficacia in eATRP e ARGET-ATRP (attivatori rigenerati per trasferimento elettronico, in cui un agente riducente è usato per rigenerare continuamente CuI). Catalizzatori idrofilici tradizionali sono stati usati in combinazione con surfattanti anionici poco costosi, formando coppie ioniche capaci di entrare negli agglomerati monomerici e catalizzare la polimerizzazione. L’interazione tra le specie reagenti è stata provata attraverso caratterizzazioni elettrochimiche e spettrochimiche, che hanno permesso di definire il diverso contributo di catalisi interfacciale e via coppie ioniche. Grazie a questo approccio sono stati prodotti copolimeri a blocchi, a stella e a spazzola. Inoltre il Cu residuo nei polimeri precipitati è risultato estremamente poco, in alcuni casi inferiore ad 1 ppm, quindi i polimeri non necessitano di ulteriore purificazione. Il sistema catalitico è stato poi applicato in ARGET-ATRP in emulsione, sfruttando la presenza di un catalizzatore idrofilico, essenziale in emulsione dove la polimerizzazione deve verificarsi in fase acquosa. ARGET-ATRP ben controllate in emulsione ab initio sono state ottenute, anche con basse quantità di surfattante, ottimizzando la procedura di pre-emulsificazione, la velocità di mescolamento e selezionando opportuni iniziatori idrofilici.

L'elettrochimica quale strumento fondamentale per accrescere la comprensione e l'implementazione della polimerizzazione radicalica per trasferimento di atomo - Electrochemistry as a crucial tool to broaden atom transfer radical polymerization understanding and implementation / Lorandi, Francesca. - (2018 Jan 14).

L'elettrochimica quale strumento fondamentale per accrescere la comprensione e l'implementazione della polimerizzazione radicalica per trasferimento di atomo - Electrochemistry as a crucial tool to broaden atom transfer radical polymerization understanding and implementation

Lorandi, Francesca
2018-01-14

Abstract

Controlling processes by electrochemical means is increasingly attracting the attention of organic and polymer chemists. Electrochemistry provides tunable parameters without requiring the addition of external compounds, often increasing system tolerance to impurities, thus facilitating reaction handling and switching among different stages. In the last decades, the main interest in polymer chemistry concerned the preparation of predetermined macromolecular architectures. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is the most powerful and versatile method to build well-defined polymers, with narrow molecular-weight distribution and excellent retention of chain-end functionalities. ATRP is based on the reversible deactivation of propagating radicals, such as to extend the lifetime of polymer chains. Radical concentration in solution is always very low, ultimately minimizing their probability of terminating. The activation-deactivation equilibrium is generally governed by a metal catalyst, composed by copper and a polydentate amine ligand. The active form of the catalyst, [CuIL]+, generates radicals by reductive cleavage of the C–X bond in the alkyl halide initiator, RX. As a consequence of the electron transfer and the concurrent atom transfer, the deactivator [X–CuIIL]+ is formed. Generated radicals add to few monomer molecules (i.e. propagation reaction), then they are reverted to their dormant state by reacting with [X–CuIIL]+. Importantly, RX initiators should be highly reactive, as to ensure the simultaneous growth of all polymer chains, thereby targeting pre-determined molecular weights. Chain-end functionalities are preserved during the polymerization, thus enabling several post-polymerization processes and the building of copolymers with various compositions and topologies. The aim of this thesis is to affirm electrochemical tools as a primary, effective and accessible source for ATRP triggering and mechanistic analysis. Less than 20 years ago, electrochemistry was involved for the first time in ATRP, when standard reduction potentials of some common catalysts were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and correlated to their catalytic performances. Since then, CV is a well-established technique to study the redox properties of ATRP catalysts and the relative affinity of CuI and CuII species for halide ions, hence predicting their activity in the polymerization. Moreover, many electrochemical procedures were arranged for the precise measurement of the activation rate constant, kact, which concerns the reaction between [CuIL]+ and RX. kact values spanning over a range of 12 orders of magnitude were measured with different techniques, in many environments. Among these techniques, the use of a rotating disk electrode allowed a fast, easy and highly reproducible measurement. This instrument was further exploited in this thesis work to set up a facile electrochemical procedure for the determination of the thermodynamic equilibrium constant of ATRP, KATRP. Essentially, the reaction between CuI species and RX was followed as for kact determination, but in the absence of a radical scavenger that had been used to kinetically isolate the activation step. The interplay between activation, deactivation and radical termination was monitored, and KATRP was obtained by elaborating the electrochemical response through an equation proposed by Fischer and recently slightly modified. The method was applied to different Cu catalysts, initiators, solvent/monomer combinations and temperatures, observing some trends in accordance with general ATRP understanding. Both kact and KATRP must be measured in the absence of halide ions, which strongly affect the speciation of CuI. Indeed, the amount of active [CuIL]+ is reduced by the formation of various halogenated CuI species, thus slowing down the reaction with RX. However, the drop in the rate of CuI consumption in the presence of different C_(X^- ) was used to estimate the association constant of X− to [CuIL]+ (i.e. CuI halidophilicity constant, K_X^I). A procedure to measure K_X^I from K_ATRP^app, obtained under various C_(X^- ), was reported and verified for an independently determined K_X^I value. Electrochemistry is not only used to study ATRP mechanism, but also to effectively trigger the polymerization process. In fact, an applied current or potential is used to re-generate CuI from [X–CuIIL]+, which accumulates in solution because of termination events. Electrochemically mediated ATRP (eATRP) uses electrons as a reducing agent, thus it is free of by-products and allows to start from a minimum amount of air-stable CuII, which is reduced in situ. Nonetheless, the traditional eATRP setup required a potentiostat and expensive Platinum electrodes. During my Ph.D., I tried to simplify the setup as to make eATRP a cost-effective and scalable technique. Various inexpensive and easily functionalizable materials were successfully used as cathodes for eATRP in both organic and aqueous media. These working electrodes allowed well-controlled polymerizations even under galvanostatic conditions (i.e. constant current steps), which permitted the use of two, instead of three electrodes, and the replacement of the potentiostat with a common current generator. Furthermore, these cathodes were coupled to a sacrificial Aluminum anode in a completely Pt-free setup. Finally, these materials did not release metal ions in solution during the polymerization, and their morphology was not modified, thus they could be re-used in consecutive experiments. One important feature of eATRP and ATRP in general is their high versatility. Actually, various types of monomers are suitable for these techniques. Instead, controlled polymerization of acidic monomers via ATRP was considered impossible until very recently. In 2016, Fantin at al. proved that growing chains of poly(methacrylic acid) in ATRP were affected by a cyclization reaction with loss of C-X functionalities, i.e. termination. Suitable conditions to overcome this issue were proposed and successful eATRPs of methacrylic acid were reported. This important achievement was extended to acrylic acid (AA), which is a biocompatible, largely used monomer. In this thesis, it is proved that AA polymerization was hampered by the same cyclization side reaction during eATRP. Indeed, some conditions that were suitable for methacrylic acid were successfully adapted to eATRP of AA. i) Chloride ions replaced bromides, and ii) polymerization rate was enhanced by using a cathode with large surface area, applying a strongly negative potential, compared to Eѳ of the catalyst, and optimizing the amount and the nature of other reactants. One way to broaden the applicability of ATRP is to design new ligands able to convey particular features to Cu catalysts. Herein, 4 new ligands are presented, in which the skeleton of the traditionally used tris(2-methylpyridyl)amine (TPMA) was modified with m-functionalized phenyl substituents. Electrochemical characterizations of Cu complexes with these ligands allowed to predict a lower activity toward RX, compared to parent TPMA, which was proved by kact determination. Nevertheless, these complexes were used to catalyze well-controlled eATRPs of methyl methacrylate in DMF, and oligo (ethyleneoxide) methyl ether methacrylate and methacrylic acid in water. Despite the low activity, these compounds were very stable even at acidic pH and can be used to tune the polymerization in extremely reactive system. The versatility of ATRP is also reflected by the application in different environments. Ionic liquids for example are attracting great interest as green solvents for polymerizations. In 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate, the redox properties of common ATRP catalysts and initiators were investigated by CV, whereas kinetic studies were performed via rotating disk electrode. This work proved that the behavior of Cu complexes and RX in ILs is similar to the one observed in traditional organic solvents. Therefore, ILs are suitable media for controlled polymerizations, and particularly they should be applied as solvent for eATRP because they are sufficiently conductive without added supporting electrolytes. Dispersed media represent another eco-friendly environment for polymerizations. Although many industrial processes are based on (mini)emulsion systems, the vast majority of literature reports on ATRP concerns experiments in homogeneous solutions. ATRP in miniemulsion required the design of super hydrophobic catalysts that remained confined into hydrophobic droplets, whereby tuning the polymerization. During my Ph.D., I spent six months as a visiting student at Carnegie Mellon University, in the laboratory of Prof. Matyjaszewski, who discovered ATRP in 1995. There, I had the opportunity to work on ATRP in miniemulsion and emulsion. A new catalytic system was arranged, and effectively applied to eATRP and activators re-generated by electron transfer (ARGET) ATRP, in which a reducing agent is added to continuously re-generate CuI species. Common hydrophilic catalysts were combined to inexpensive surfactants to form ion pairs able to enter the monomer droplets and catalyze the process. Electrochemical and spectrochemical characterizations proved the interactions between the compounds and defined the different contributions from ion-pair and interfacial catalysis. Block copolymers, polymer stars and brushes were easily synthetized with this approach. Moreover, residual copper in precipitated polymers was very low, even < 1 ppm, thus avoiding the need of further purifications. The system was then adapted to emulsion ARGET-ATRP, taking advantage of the water-solubility of the catalyst, which is a requirement of emulsion polymerizations, where the process should occur in the aqueous phase. By using suitable hydrophilic initiators and finely tuning the stirring rate and the pre-emulsification procedure, well controlled ab initio emulsion ARGET-ATRPs were obtained, even with low surfactant amounts.
La possibilità di controllare processi per via elettrochimica riveste crescente attenzione nel mondo della chimica organica e della sintesi di polimeri. L’elettrochimica offre diversi parametri per intervenire sulle proprietà dei sistemi in oggetto, senza introdurre altri agenti chimici e spesso aumentando la tolleranza del sistema verso le impurezze. Di conseguenza la gestione del processo e il passaggio tra diversi stadi risultano facilitati. Negli ultimi dieci anni, il principale interesse nel campo della sintesi polimerica riguarda la preparazione di macromolecole con architetture predeterminate. La polimerizzazione radicalica per trasferimento di atomo (ATRP) è la tecnica più versatile e affermata per la costruzione di polimeri ben definiti, con stretta distribuzione di pesi molecolari ed eccellente ritenzione di funzionalità di fine catena. L’ATRP si basa sulla disattivazione reversibile dei radicali propaganti, in modo da allungare il tempo di vita delle catene in crescita. La concentrazione di radicali in soluzione rimane sempre molto bassa, portando così a minimizzare la probabilità dei radicali stessi di essere soggetti a terminazione. L’equilibrio di attivazione-disattivazione è generalmente governato da un catalizzatore metallico, composto da un centro di rame e un legante amminico polidentato. Nella sua forma attiva, [CuIL]+, il catalizzatore genera radicali per rottura riduttiva del legame C–X nell’alogenuro alchilico, RX, utilizzato come iniziatore. La specie disattivante [X–CuIIL]+ si forma in seguito al trasferimento elettronico e atomico che avvengono in contemporanea. I radicali generati riescono ad addizionare solo poche molecole di monomero (reazione di propagazione), prima di essere riconvertiti al loro stato dormiente tramite reazione con [X–CuIIL]+. In ATRP è importante che gli iniziatori siano altamente reattivi, in modo da garantire la crescita simultanea di tutte le catene e quindi poter ottenere pesi molecolari predeterminati. Le funzionalità di fine catena non vengono intaccate durante la polimerizzazione e questo permette di sottoporre il polimero a processi di post-polimerizzazione e di costruire copolimeri con varie composizioni e topologie. Lo scopo di questa tesi di dottorato è quello di affermare l’elettrochimica come fondamentale, accessibile ed efficace risorsa per l’analisi meccanicistica dei processi di ATRP e anche per condurre questo tipo di polimerizzazioni. Meno di venti anni fa, studi elettrochimici furono per la prima volta utilizzati in ATRP: i potenziali standard di riduzione di alcuni catalizzatori comunemente usati furono determinati tramite voltammetria ciclica (CV) e correlati alle performances catalitiche di questi composti. Da allora, la CV è la tecnica per eccellenza per lo studio delle proprietà redox dei catalizzatori per ATRP, nonché per la determinazione delle affinità relative delle specie di CuI e CuII per gli ioni alogenuro, quindi per predire l’attività dei complessi nella polimerizzazione. Inoltre, diverse procedure elettrochimiche sono state messe a punto per misurare con elevata precisione la costante cinetica di attivazione, kact, che riguarda quindi la reazione tra [CuIL]+ e RX. Valori di kact che coprono 12 ordini di grandezza sono stati misurati con diverse tecniche, in vari ambienti. Tra le suddette tecniche, l’utilizzo di un elettrodo a disco rotante (RDE) consente misure rapide, facilmente realizzabili e altamente riproducibili. Il RDE è stato usato in questo lavoro di tesi per definire una semplice procedura elettrochimica per la determinazione della costante termodinamica di equilibrio di ATRP, KATRP. Sostanzialmente con questo strumento è stata seguita la reazione tra CuI e RX, come avveniva per la misura di kact, ma in questo caso non si è introdotto nel sistema un catturatore radicalico, che serviva per isolare cineticamente lo step di attivazione. Quindi le reazioni di attivazione, disattivazione e terminazione radicalica sono state contemporaneamente monitorate e il valore di KATRP è stato ottenuto dall’elaborazione del responso elettrochimico tramite un’equazione, originariamente proposta da Fischer e in seguito opportunamente modificata. Il metodo è stato applicato a diversi catalizzatori, iniziatori, combinazioni di solvente e monomero e temperature, osservando dei trends nelle costanti in accordo con i principi di ATRP. KATRP e kact devono essere determinate in assenza di ioni alogenuro, i quali influenzano fortemente la speciazione dei complessi di CuI. Infatti, la quantità della specie attiva [CuIL]+ viene diminuita a causa della formazione di specie di CuI variamente alogenate, di conseguenza la sua reazione con RX risulta rallentata. Dalla riduzione nella velocità con cui CuI viene consumato al variare di C_(X^- ) è stato possibile stimare la costante di associazione di X− a [CuIL] + (o alidofilicità di CuI, K_X^I). Viene quindi presentata una procedura per determinare K_X^I dai valori di K_ATRP^app, determinati via RDE in presenza di diverse concentrazioni di X−. Oltre a fornire strumenti per studi di tipo meccanicistico, l’elettrochimica viene usata anche come driving force del processo di polimerizzazione. Infatti, un potenziale o una corrente possono essere applicati al sistema per rigenerare la specie di CuI, da [X–CuIIL]+ che si accumula in seguito al verificarsi di reazioni di terminazione radicalica. La polimerizzazione radicalica per trasferimento di atomo mediata elettrochimicamente (eATRP) sfrutta gli elettroni come agenti riducenti, quindi non porta alla formazione di sottoprodotti e consente di usare come reagente un sale di CuII, stabile all’aria, che viene poi ridotto in situ. Il tradizionale setup per eATRP richiede però un potenziostato e costosi elettrodi di Platino. Durante il mio periodo di dottorato ho cercato di semplificare il setup di eATRP, così da rendere questa tecnica più conveniente e realizzabile su larga scala. Alcuni materiali non costosi e facilmente funzionalizzabili sono stati testati come catodi in solventi organici e in sistemi acquosi. Polimerizzazioni ben controllate sono state ottenute con gli elettrodi lavoranti analizzati, anche operando in modalità galvanostatica (i.e. applicando step a corrente costante), la quale consente di utilizzare due elettrodi anziché tre, e di sostituire il potenziostato con un semplice generatore di corrente. Inoltre, questi catodi hanno dato ottimi risultati anche in combinazione con un anodo sacrificale di Alluminio, quindi realizzando un setup completamente Pt-free. Infine, è stato dimostrato che questi materiali non rilasciano ioni metallici in soluzione e che la loro morfologia non viene modificata nel corso delle polimerizzazioni, pertanto possono essere riutilizzati in reazioni successive. Caratteristica distintiva dell’eATRP e della ATRP in generale è l’eccezionale versatilità di queste tecniche, che consentono di polimerizzare diverse tipologie di monomeri. Per molti anni però, fu ritenuto impossibile controllare la polimerizzazione di monomeri acidi via ATRP. Nel 2016, Fantin et al. hanno dimostrato che le catene propaganti di poli(acido metacrilico) tendono a ciclizzare, con conseguente perdita della funzionalità C–X, quindi terminazione. Una volta definite le condizioni adatte per evitare questa pericolosa reazione secondaria, è stato possibile controllare efficacemente la polimerizzazione dell’acido metacrilico tramite eATRP. Questa importante vittoria mi ha permesso di lavorare con successo alla polimerizzazione dell’acido acrilico (AA), monomero biocompatibile, usato in moltissimi settori. Innanzitutto è stato dimostrato che la propagazione di AA è affetta dalla stessa reazione parassita di ciclizzazione, quindi alcune delle condizioni che hanno permesso l’efficace eATRP dell’acido metacrilico, sono state adattate al sistema analizzato. i) Il sale bromurato è stato sostituito da un sale clorurato, ii) la velocità di polimerizzazione è stata massimizzata usando un elettrodo lavorante con elevata area superficiale, applicando un potenziale molto più negativo di quello standard di riduzione del catalizzatore e ottimizzando la composizione del sistema. Un modo efficace per aumentare l’applicabilità della ATRP consiste nella sintesi di nuovi leganti che conferiscano particolari proprietà al centro metallico. Nella tesi sono riportati 4 nuovi leganti, in cui lo scheletro del legante tris-2(metilpiridil)ammina (TPMA), comunemente usato in ATRP, è stato modificato con sostituenti fenilici variamente funzionalizzati in posizione meta. La caratterizzazione elettrochimica dei complessi di Cu con questi leganti ha portato a predire una minore attività rispetto al tradizionale Cu/TPMA. Questa è stata confermata dalla determinazione di kact tramite RDE. Ciononostante, questi complessi sono risultati efficaci catalizzatori in eATRP di metil metacrilato in DMF, e di oligo(etilene glicole)metil etere metacrilato e di acido metacrilico in acqua. Nonostante la non elevata attività, i complessi analizzati hanno mostrato buona stabilità in acqua, anche a pH acido, e si propongono come catalizzatori adeguati per sistemi altamente reattivi. La versatilità di queste polimerizzazioni si riflette nella possibilità di applicazione in un’ampia varietà di ambienti. Grande interesse, ad esempio, è rivolto all’utilizzo di Liquidi Ionici (ILs) come solventi di polimerizzazione “green”. Pertanto, le proprietà redox di alcuni catalizzatori e iniziatori, frequentemente usati in ATRP, sono state studiate tramite CV in 1-butil-3-metilimidazolio trifluorometansolfonato. Nello stesso sono stati effettuati studi cinetici via RDE. Queste analisi hanno permesso di affermare che il comportamento dei composti di Cu e degli alogenuri alchilici in IL è del tutto simile a quello osservato nei solventi organici tradizionali. Perciò, i liquidi ionici si confermano come solventi adatti a processi di polimerizzazione controllata. Appare infine auspicabile realizzare eATRP in ILs, perché la buona conducibilità elettrica di questi solventi consente di evitare l’aggiunta di un elettrolita di supporto. Un ulteriore ambiente sostenibile di polimerizzazione è rappresentato dai sistemi dispersi. Sebbene moltissime polimerizzazioni su scala industriale si basino su sistemi in (mini)emulsione, la maggior parte della letteratura che tratta di ATRP riporta processi in soluzione omogenea. La realizzazione di ATRP in miniemulsione ha richiesto la sintesi di opportuni leganti super-idrofobici, che consentissero di confinare il catalizzatore nella fase dispersa idrofobica, dove potesse esercitare il suo effetto. Durante il mio dottorato ho trascorso sei mesi come visiting student presso la Carnegie Mellon University, nei laboratorio del Prof. Matyjaszewski, che scoprì l’ATRP nel 1995. In quel periodo ho potuto lavorare estesamente su ATRP in miniemulsione ed emulsione. Un nuovo sistema catalitico è stato messo a punto e applicato con efficacia in eATRP e ARGET-ATRP (attivatori rigenerati per trasferimento elettronico, in cui un agente riducente è usato per rigenerare continuamente CuI). Catalizzatori idrofilici tradizionali sono stati usati in combinazione con surfattanti anionici poco costosi, formando coppie ioniche capaci di entrare negli agglomerati monomerici e catalizzare la polimerizzazione. L’interazione tra le specie reagenti è stata provata attraverso caratterizzazioni elettrochimiche e spettrochimiche, che hanno permesso di definire il diverso contributo di catalisi interfacciale e via coppie ioniche. Grazie a questo approccio sono stati prodotti copolimeri a blocchi, a stella e a spazzola. Inoltre il Cu residuo nei polimeri precipitati è risultato estremamente poco, in alcuni casi inferiore ad 1 ppm, quindi i polimeri non necessitano di ulteriore purificazione. Il sistema catalitico è stato poi applicato in ARGET-ATRP in emulsione, sfruttando la presenza di un catalizzatore idrofilico, essenziale in emulsione dove la polimerizzazione deve verificarsi in fase acquosa. ARGET-ATRP ben controllate in emulsione ab initio sono state ottenute, anche con basse quantità di surfattante, ottimizzando la procedura di pre-emulsificazione, la velocità di mescolamento e selezionando opportuni iniziatori idrofilici.
ATRP, electrochemically triggered polymerizations, rotating disk electrode, (mini)emulsion polymerization, acidic monomers
L'elettrochimica quale strumento fondamentale per accrescere la comprensione e l'implementazione della polimerizzazione radicalica per trasferimento di atomo - Electrochemistry as a crucial tool to broaden atom transfer radical polymerization understanding and implementation / Lorandi, Francesca. - (2018 Jan 14).
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
tesi_Francesca_Lorandi.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Tesi di dottorato
Licenza: Non specificato
Dimensione 5.94 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
5.94 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3421943
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact