Mitochondria are double membrane–enclosed organelles that play a crucial role in ATP production, metabolism, regulation of cellular signaling and amplification of programmed cell death (Wasilewski and Scorrano, 2009). In the process of apoptosis mitochondria release cytochrome c and other cofactors that are required to amplify cell death (Li et al., 1997). The complete release of cytochrome c depends on the changes in the shape and in the ultrastructure of the organelle, since during these processes mitochondrial network undergoes fragmentation, that is accompanied by cristae remodeling and widening of cristae junctions (Frank et al., 2001; Scorrano et al., 2002). Of note, deregulation of apoptosis represents a typical hallmark of cancer, since cancer cells exploit the inhibition of the mitochondrial arm of apoptosis to acquire the malignant phenotype (Thompson, 1995). Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, and all processes that impinge on the changes in the shape and in the ultrastructure of the organelle are controlled by a regulated action of mitochondria shaping proteins, which represent large GTPases that share structural homology with the dynamin protein family (Dimmer and Scorrano, 2006). Mitochondrial shape in the steady state is a result of the balanced action of fission and fusion events (Griparic and van der Bliek, 2001). The process of mitochondrial fission is controlled by a synchronized action of a cytosolic protein Drp1 (Dynamin – related protein 1) (Cereghetti et al., 2008), that is recruited to the outer mitochondrial membrane where it binds its adaptors Fis1 (Fission – 1), MFF (Mitochondrial fission factor), Mid49 and Mid51 (Mitochondrial division), and participates in the division of mitochondria (Palmer et al., 2011). Mitochondrial fusion, on the other hand, is a process controlled by mitofusins (Mfn1 and Mfn2), proteins located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, together with the only inner membrane GTPase - Optic Atrophy 1 (Opa1) (Santel and Fuller, 2001; Chen et al., 2003; Cipolat et al., 2004). In humans, alternative splicing of Opa1 gives rise to 8 mRNA splice variants which further get processed by proteolytic proteases giving rise to 2 long and 3 short forms of Opa1 (Olichon et al., 2007; Duvezin-Caubet et al., 2007). Opa1 is a multifunctional protein: apart from its function in promoting mitochondrial fusion (Cipolat et al., 2004), it also plays a role in the control of apoptosis by keeping in check the cristae remodeling pathway, by forming multimeric complexes at the cristae junctions, keeping in shape the size of these junctions (Frezza et al., 2006; Cipolat et al., 2006). Another important role of Opa1 is in the control of mitochondrial metabolism, because Opa1 favors the superassembly of respiratory chain complexes into supercomplexes, increasing the efficiency of oxidative phosphorilation (Cogliati et al., 2013). All these functions concur to determine the beneficial outcome of its mild overexpression in vivo, which protects from heart and brain ischaemia, denervation-induced muscular atrophy and fulminant hepatitis (Varanita et al., 2015). Furthermore, it corrects mouse models of primary mitochondrial dysfunction caused by defects in components of the respiratory chain (Civiletto et al., 2015). However, all these beneficial effects come with a counterpart, since a handful of studies reported that Opa1 is overexpressed in several human cancers where high levels of Opa1 correlated with a worst prognosis and an impaired response to therapy (Fang et al., 2012), while blocking its expression was associated with an induction of the mitochondria - associated apoptotic pathway in the cancer cell and a better clinical outcome (Zhao et al., 2013). In this Thesis we set out to understand what role does Opa1 play in the acquisition and maintenance of the cancer phenotype, both in cellular and animal models, while reasoning that a possible explanation why we don’t have constitutively high Opa1 levels is the fact that the trade off of Opa1 overexpression could be an increased susceptibility to cancer development/progression. Well established cell lines, initially deriving from patients diagnosed with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) served as our in vitro model system. DLBCLs are one of the most common adult non-Hodgkin lymphoid malignancies today (Lohr et al., 2012). They are a genetically heterogeneous group of tumors that can be further divided in several subsets, identified by their distinct molecular signatures (Alizadeh et al., 2000). Genome wide arrays and multiple clustering algorithms defined a B cell receptor (BCR)/proliferation cluster (BCR–DLBCL), which displays upregulation of genes encoding BCR signaling components, and an OxPhos cluster (OxPhos–DLBCL) which is enriched in genes involved in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The OxPhos subset lacks an intact BCR signaling network, suggesting dependence on alternative survival mechanisms, which are not yet defined (Monti et al., 2005; Caro et al., 2012). Since a proteomic approach, aimed at carefully dissecting components of the mitochondrial proteome in the BCR versus OxPhos cell group, identified increased levels of Opa1 in the OxPhos (Danial N, manuscript in preparation), we wished to elucidate what role does Opa1 play in these cancer cell subsets. In order to test whether Opa1 overexpression contributes to the development and progression of cancer in vivo, we reached out to an already established mouse lymphoma model, the Eµ-myc transgenic mouse (Adams et al., 1985), that we further crossed with a mouse model of controlled Opa1 overexpression that was recently generated in our lab (Cogliati et al., 2013), and the net result of this cross gave rise to the mouse model we used in our study. In this Thesis we present evidence that Opa1 is increasingly processed in the BCR subset of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and that mitochondrial morphology, metabolism, and ultrastructure are different between the BCR and the OxPhos DLBCL subsets that display different levels of Opa1. Furthermore, we also show evidence of a marked synergy between Opa1 and c-Myc in doubly transgenic mouse models, where Opa1 overexpression is contributing to the development of, and aggravating cancer in Eμ-Myc transgenic animals. The work performed in this thesis highlights a role for Opa1 in DLBCL features, and tumor progression in vivo. Thus, our data indicate that Opa1 displays oncogenic features and it can be taken into consideration as a novel therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

I mitocondri sono organelli cellulari che svolgono un ruolo cruciale nella produzione di ATP, nel metabolismo, nella regolazione di segnali cellulari e nell'amplificazione della morte cellulare programmata (Wasilewski e Scorrano, 2009). Nel processo di apoptosi i mitocondri rilasciano citocromo c e altri cofattori necessari ad amplificare la morte cellulare (Li et al., 1997). Il rilascio completo del citocromo c dipende dai cambiamenti nella forma e nell’ultrastruttura dell’organello, poiché durante questi processi la complessa rete mitocondriale subisce frammentazione, accompagnata dall’alterazione strutturale e dall’ampliamento delle giunzioni delle creste mitocondriali (Frank et al, 2001;. Scorrano et al., 2002). Da notare che una mancata o alterata regolazione dell'apoptosi rappresenta una delle caratteristiche tipiche del cancro, poiché le cellule tumorali sfruttano l'inibizione della via apoptotica mitocondriale per acquisire il fenotipo maligno (Thompson, 1995). I mitocondri sono organelli dinamici. Tutti i processi che incidono sui cambiamenti nella forma e nell’ultrastruttura dell’organello sono controllati dall'azione coordinata di una coorte di proteine chiamate mitochondria-shaping proteins, le quali rappresentano grandi GTPasi che condividono omologia strutturale con la famiglia delle dinamine (Dimmer e Scorrano, 2006). La forma mitocondriale nello stato stazionario è il risultato dell'azione equilibrata di eventi di fissione e fusione (Griparic e van der Bliek, 2001). Il processo di fissione mitocondriale è controllato dall'azione sincrona di una proteina citosolica Drp1 (Dynamin-related protein 1) (Cereghetti et al, 2008), che viene reclutata sulla membrana mitocondriale esterna dove interagisce con i suoi adattatori Fis1 (Fission - 1), MFF (Mitochondrial Fission Factor), Mid49 e Mid51 (Mitochondrial Division 49 e Mitochondrial Division51) e partecipa alla divisione dei mitocondri (Palmer et al., 2011). La fusione mitocondriale, invece, è un processo controllato dalle Mitofusine (Mfn1 e MFN2) - proteine localizzate nella membrana mitocondriale esterna – e da Optic Atrophy 1 (Opa1), la sola GTPasi responsabile della forma mitocondriale localizzata nella membrana mitocondriale interna (Santel e Fuller, 2001; Chen et al., 2003; Cipolat et al, 2004). Negli esseri umani, lo splicing alternativo di Opa1 dà luogo a 8 varianti di splicing diverse. Queste varianti di splicing possono essere ulteriormente modificate a livello post-trascrizionale dall’azione di proteasi che danno luogo a 2 forme lunghe e 3 forme brevi di Opa1 (Olichon et al, 2007;. Duvezin-Caubet et al., 2007). Opa1 è una proteina multifunzionale: indipendentemente dalla sua funzione nel promuovere la fusione dei mitocondri, svolge anche un ruolo nel controllo dell'apoptosi, mantenendo sotto controllo la struttura e la forma delle creste mitocondriali, formando complessi multimerici localizzati alle giunzioni delle creste stesse (Cipolat et al., 2004; Frezza et al, 2006; Cipolat et al, 2006). Un altro ruolo importante di Opa1 è nel controllo del metabolismo mitocondriale, perché favorisce l’associazione dei complessi della catena respiratoria mitocondriale in supercomplessi, aumentando in questo modo l'efficienza della fosforilazione ossidativa (Cogliati et al., 2013). Tutte queste funzioni concorrono a determinare il risultato benefico di una sua lieve sovraespressione in vivo, che, infatti, è protettiva in caso di ischemia cerebrale o cardiaca, atrofia muscolare indotta da denervazione e in caso di epatite fulminante (Varanita et al., 2015). Inoltre, la sovraespressione di OPA1 corregge alcuni modelli murini di disfunzione mitocondriale primaria causata da difetti nei componenti della catena respiratoria (Civiletto et al., 2015). Tuttavia, tutti questi effetti benefici hanno una controparte negativa. Infatti, alcuni studi hanno mostrato come Opa1 sia sovraespressa in diversi tumori umani, in cui elevati livelli di Opa1 sono correlati ad una peggiore prognosi e una risposta alterata alle terapie anti-tumorali (Fang et al., 2012). Al contrario, la riduzione dell’espressione di Opa1 è stata associata all’induzione di apoptosi nelle cellule tumorali tramite la via mitocondriale e ad un migliore esito clinico (Zhao et al, 2013). In questa Tesi abbiamo deciso di investigare quale ruolo biologico giochi Opa1 nell'acquisizione e nel mantenimento del fenotipo tumorale, sia in modelli cellulari che animali, ipotizzando che una possibile spiegazione per la mancata sovraespressione costitutiva di Opa1 sia che tale sovraespressione potrebbe essere legata ad un aumento di suscettibilità allo sviluppo e/o progressione di forme tumorali. Abbiamo utilizzato linee cellulari, derivanti da pazienti con diagnosi di linfoma diffuso a grandi cellule B (DLBCL) come sistema modello in vitro. I linfomi diffusi a grandi cellule B (DLBCL) sono tra le forme più comuni di neoplasie linfoidi non-Hodgkin negli adulti (Lohr et al., 2012). Sono un gruppo geneticamente eterogeneo di tumori che possono essere ulteriormente suddivisi in diversi sottogruppi in base a caratteristiche molecolari distinte (Alizadeh et al., 2000). Attraverso un approccio basato su Genome wide array e molteplici algoritmi di clustering sono stati caratterizzati due gruppi di linfomi: il primo presenta la sovraespressione di geni che codificano per i componenti del recettore delle cellule B – BCR (BCR-DLBCL), il secondo è rappresentato da un gruppo arricchito in geni coinvolti nella fosforilazione ossidativa mitocondriale (OxPhosS-DLBCL). Il sottoinsieme OxPhos manca di una rete intatta di segnalazione a valle del BCR, suggerendo la dipendenza da meccanismi di sopravvivenza alternativi, che non sono stati ancora definiti (Monti et al., 2005; Caro et al, 2012.). Attraverso un approccio di proteomica, volto a comprendere con cura i componenti del proteoma mitocondriale del gruppo BCR nei confronti del gruppo OxPhos, è stato osservato che i livelli di Opa1 nelle cellule OxPhos sono più alti (Danial N, manoscritto in preparazione). Per tale ragione abbiamo voluto chiarire quale ruolo giochi Opa1 in questi sottoinsiemi di cellule di cancro. Al fine di verificare se la sovraespressione di Opa1 contribuisca allo sviluppo e alla progressione del cancro in vivo, abbiamo utilizzato un modello noto e caratterizzato di linfoma in topo, il topo transgenico Eμ-myc (Adams et al., 1985). I topi Eμ-myc sono stati ulteriormente incrociati con un modello murino di sovraespressione Opa1, recentemente generato nel nostro laboratorio (Cogliati et al., 2013). Il risultato di questo incrocio ha generato il modello di topo che abbiamo usato nel nostro studio. In questa Tesi presentiamo prove che Opa1 è processata in forme più brevi nel sottoinsieme di DLBCL caratterizzato dalla sovraespressione di componenti del BCR e che, come risultato, la morfologia mitocondriale, il metabolismo e l’ultrastruttura sono diversi tra i sottoinsiemi BCR e OxPhos. Inoltre, mostriamo anche la prova di una marcata sinergia tra Opa1 e c-Myc in modelli murini transgenici, dove la sovraespressione di Opa1 contribuisce e aggrava lo sviluppo di cancro nel modello murino Eμ-Myc. Il lavoro svolto in questa Tesi mette in evidenza un ruolo per Opa1 nel definire le caratteristiche dei linfomi diffusi a grandi cellule B (DLBCL) e nella progressione dei tumori in vivo. In conclusione, i nostri dati indicano che Opa1 mostra caratteristiche pro-oncogeniche e che può essere presa in considerazione come nuovo bersaglio terapeutico per il trattamento del cancro.

In vitro and in vivo study of the role of the mitochondria-shaping protein Opa1 in cancer / Samardzic, Dijana. - (2016 Jan 31).

In vitro and in vivo study of the role of the mitochondria-shaping protein Opa1 in cancer

Samardzic, Dijana
2016

Abstract

Mitochondria are double membrane–enclosed organelles that play a crucial role in ATP production, metabolism, regulation of cellular signaling and amplification of programmed cell death (Wasilewski and Scorrano, 2009). In the process of apoptosis mitochondria release cytochrome c and other cofactors that are required to amplify cell death (Li et al., 1997). The complete release of cytochrome c depends on the changes in the shape and in the ultrastructure of the organelle, since during these processes mitochondrial network undergoes fragmentation, that is accompanied by cristae remodeling and widening of cristae junctions (Frank et al., 2001; Scorrano et al., 2002). Of note, deregulation of apoptosis represents a typical hallmark of cancer, since cancer cells exploit the inhibition of the mitochondrial arm of apoptosis to acquire the malignant phenotype (Thompson, 1995). Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, and all processes that impinge on the changes in the shape and in the ultrastructure of the organelle are controlled by a regulated action of mitochondria shaping proteins, which represent large GTPases that share structural homology with the dynamin protein family (Dimmer and Scorrano, 2006). Mitochondrial shape in the steady state is a result of the balanced action of fission and fusion events (Griparic and van der Bliek, 2001). The process of mitochondrial fission is controlled by a synchronized action of a cytosolic protein Drp1 (Dynamin – related protein 1) (Cereghetti et al., 2008), that is recruited to the outer mitochondrial membrane where it binds its adaptors Fis1 (Fission – 1), MFF (Mitochondrial fission factor), Mid49 and Mid51 (Mitochondrial division), and participates in the division of mitochondria (Palmer et al., 2011). Mitochondrial fusion, on the other hand, is a process controlled by mitofusins (Mfn1 and Mfn2), proteins located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, together with the only inner membrane GTPase - Optic Atrophy 1 (Opa1) (Santel and Fuller, 2001; Chen et al., 2003; Cipolat et al., 2004). In humans, alternative splicing of Opa1 gives rise to 8 mRNA splice variants which further get processed by proteolytic proteases giving rise to 2 long and 3 short forms of Opa1 (Olichon et al., 2007; Duvezin-Caubet et al., 2007). Opa1 is a multifunctional protein: apart from its function in promoting mitochondrial fusion (Cipolat et al., 2004), it also plays a role in the control of apoptosis by keeping in check the cristae remodeling pathway, by forming multimeric complexes at the cristae junctions, keeping in shape the size of these junctions (Frezza et al., 2006; Cipolat et al., 2006). Another important role of Opa1 is in the control of mitochondrial metabolism, because Opa1 favors the superassembly of respiratory chain complexes into supercomplexes, increasing the efficiency of oxidative phosphorilation (Cogliati et al., 2013). All these functions concur to determine the beneficial outcome of its mild overexpression in vivo, which protects from heart and brain ischaemia, denervation-induced muscular atrophy and fulminant hepatitis (Varanita et al., 2015). Furthermore, it corrects mouse models of primary mitochondrial dysfunction caused by defects in components of the respiratory chain (Civiletto et al., 2015). However, all these beneficial effects come with a counterpart, since a handful of studies reported that Opa1 is overexpressed in several human cancers where high levels of Opa1 correlated with a worst prognosis and an impaired response to therapy (Fang et al., 2012), while blocking its expression was associated with an induction of the mitochondria - associated apoptotic pathway in the cancer cell and a better clinical outcome (Zhao et al., 2013). In this Thesis we set out to understand what role does Opa1 play in the acquisition and maintenance of the cancer phenotype, both in cellular and animal models, while reasoning that a possible explanation why we don’t have constitutively high Opa1 levels is the fact that the trade off of Opa1 overexpression could be an increased susceptibility to cancer development/progression. Well established cell lines, initially deriving from patients diagnosed with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) served as our in vitro model system. DLBCLs are one of the most common adult non-Hodgkin lymphoid malignancies today (Lohr et al., 2012). They are a genetically heterogeneous group of tumors that can be further divided in several subsets, identified by their distinct molecular signatures (Alizadeh et al., 2000). Genome wide arrays and multiple clustering algorithms defined a B cell receptor (BCR)/proliferation cluster (BCR–DLBCL), which displays upregulation of genes encoding BCR signaling components, and an OxPhos cluster (OxPhos–DLBCL) which is enriched in genes involved in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The OxPhos subset lacks an intact BCR signaling network, suggesting dependence on alternative survival mechanisms, which are not yet defined (Monti et al., 2005; Caro et al., 2012). Since a proteomic approach, aimed at carefully dissecting components of the mitochondrial proteome in the BCR versus OxPhos cell group, identified increased levels of Opa1 in the OxPhos (Danial N, manuscript in preparation), we wished to elucidate what role does Opa1 play in these cancer cell subsets. In order to test whether Opa1 overexpression contributes to the development and progression of cancer in vivo, we reached out to an already established mouse lymphoma model, the Eµ-myc transgenic mouse (Adams et al., 1985), that we further crossed with a mouse model of controlled Opa1 overexpression that was recently generated in our lab (Cogliati et al., 2013), and the net result of this cross gave rise to the mouse model we used in our study. In this Thesis we present evidence that Opa1 is increasingly processed in the BCR subset of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and that mitochondrial morphology, metabolism, and ultrastructure are different between the BCR and the OxPhos DLBCL subsets that display different levels of Opa1. Furthermore, we also show evidence of a marked synergy between Opa1 and c-Myc in doubly transgenic mouse models, where Opa1 overexpression is contributing to the development of, and aggravating cancer in Eμ-Myc transgenic animals. The work performed in this thesis highlights a role for Opa1 in DLBCL features, and tumor progression in vivo. Thus, our data indicate that Opa1 displays oncogenic features and it can be taken into consideration as a novel therapeutic target for cancer treatment.
I mitocondri sono organelli cellulari che svolgono un ruolo cruciale nella produzione di ATP, nel metabolismo, nella regolazione di segnali cellulari e nell'amplificazione della morte cellulare programmata (Wasilewski e Scorrano, 2009). Nel processo di apoptosi i mitocondri rilasciano citocromo c e altri cofattori necessari ad amplificare la morte cellulare (Li et al., 1997). Il rilascio completo del citocromo c dipende dai cambiamenti nella forma e nell’ultrastruttura dell’organello, poiché durante questi processi la complessa rete mitocondriale subisce frammentazione, accompagnata dall’alterazione strutturale e dall’ampliamento delle giunzioni delle creste mitocondriali (Frank et al, 2001;. Scorrano et al., 2002). Da notare che una mancata o alterata regolazione dell'apoptosi rappresenta una delle caratteristiche tipiche del cancro, poiché le cellule tumorali sfruttano l'inibizione della via apoptotica mitocondriale per acquisire il fenotipo maligno (Thompson, 1995). I mitocondri sono organelli dinamici. Tutti i processi che incidono sui cambiamenti nella forma e nell’ultrastruttura dell’organello sono controllati dall'azione coordinata di una coorte di proteine chiamate mitochondria-shaping proteins, le quali rappresentano grandi GTPasi che condividono omologia strutturale con la famiglia delle dinamine (Dimmer e Scorrano, 2006). La forma mitocondriale nello stato stazionario è il risultato dell'azione equilibrata di eventi di fissione e fusione (Griparic e van der Bliek, 2001). Il processo di fissione mitocondriale è controllato dall'azione sincrona di una proteina citosolica Drp1 (Dynamin-related protein 1) (Cereghetti et al, 2008), che viene reclutata sulla membrana mitocondriale esterna dove interagisce con i suoi adattatori Fis1 (Fission - 1), MFF (Mitochondrial Fission Factor), Mid49 e Mid51 (Mitochondrial Division 49 e Mitochondrial Division51) e partecipa alla divisione dei mitocondri (Palmer et al., 2011). La fusione mitocondriale, invece, è un processo controllato dalle Mitofusine (Mfn1 e MFN2) - proteine localizzate nella membrana mitocondriale esterna – e da Optic Atrophy 1 (Opa1), la sola GTPasi responsabile della forma mitocondriale localizzata nella membrana mitocondriale interna (Santel e Fuller, 2001; Chen et al., 2003; Cipolat et al, 2004). Negli esseri umani, lo splicing alternativo di Opa1 dà luogo a 8 varianti di splicing diverse. Queste varianti di splicing possono essere ulteriormente modificate a livello post-trascrizionale dall’azione di proteasi che danno luogo a 2 forme lunghe e 3 forme brevi di Opa1 (Olichon et al, 2007;. Duvezin-Caubet et al., 2007). Opa1 è una proteina multifunzionale: indipendentemente dalla sua funzione nel promuovere la fusione dei mitocondri, svolge anche un ruolo nel controllo dell'apoptosi, mantenendo sotto controllo la struttura e la forma delle creste mitocondriali, formando complessi multimerici localizzati alle giunzioni delle creste stesse (Cipolat et al., 2004; Frezza et al, 2006; Cipolat et al, 2006). Un altro ruolo importante di Opa1 è nel controllo del metabolismo mitocondriale, perché favorisce l’associazione dei complessi della catena respiratoria mitocondriale in supercomplessi, aumentando in questo modo l'efficienza della fosforilazione ossidativa (Cogliati et al., 2013). Tutte queste funzioni concorrono a determinare il risultato benefico di una sua lieve sovraespressione in vivo, che, infatti, è protettiva in caso di ischemia cerebrale o cardiaca, atrofia muscolare indotta da denervazione e in caso di epatite fulminante (Varanita et al., 2015). Inoltre, la sovraespressione di OPA1 corregge alcuni modelli murini di disfunzione mitocondriale primaria causata da difetti nei componenti della catena respiratoria (Civiletto et al., 2015). Tuttavia, tutti questi effetti benefici hanno una controparte negativa. Infatti, alcuni studi hanno mostrato come Opa1 sia sovraespressa in diversi tumori umani, in cui elevati livelli di Opa1 sono correlati ad una peggiore prognosi e una risposta alterata alle terapie anti-tumorali (Fang et al., 2012). Al contrario, la riduzione dell’espressione di Opa1 è stata associata all’induzione di apoptosi nelle cellule tumorali tramite la via mitocondriale e ad un migliore esito clinico (Zhao et al, 2013). In questa Tesi abbiamo deciso di investigare quale ruolo biologico giochi Opa1 nell'acquisizione e nel mantenimento del fenotipo tumorale, sia in modelli cellulari che animali, ipotizzando che una possibile spiegazione per la mancata sovraespressione costitutiva di Opa1 sia che tale sovraespressione potrebbe essere legata ad un aumento di suscettibilità allo sviluppo e/o progressione di forme tumorali. Abbiamo utilizzato linee cellulari, derivanti da pazienti con diagnosi di linfoma diffuso a grandi cellule B (DLBCL) come sistema modello in vitro. I linfomi diffusi a grandi cellule B (DLBCL) sono tra le forme più comuni di neoplasie linfoidi non-Hodgkin negli adulti (Lohr et al., 2012). Sono un gruppo geneticamente eterogeneo di tumori che possono essere ulteriormente suddivisi in diversi sottogruppi in base a caratteristiche molecolari distinte (Alizadeh et al., 2000). Attraverso un approccio basato su Genome wide array e molteplici algoritmi di clustering sono stati caratterizzati due gruppi di linfomi: il primo presenta la sovraespressione di geni che codificano per i componenti del recettore delle cellule B – BCR (BCR-DLBCL), il secondo è rappresentato da un gruppo arricchito in geni coinvolti nella fosforilazione ossidativa mitocondriale (OxPhosS-DLBCL). Il sottoinsieme OxPhos manca di una rete intatta di segnalazione a valle del BCR, suggerendo la dipendenza da meccanismi di sopravvivenza alternativi, che non sono stati ancora definiti (Monti et al., 2005; Caro et al, 2012.). Attraverso un approccio di proteomica, volto a comprendere con cura i componenti del proteoma mitocondriale del gruppo BCR nei confronti del gruppo OxPhos, è stato osservato che i livelli di Opa1 nelle cellule OxPhos sono più alti (Danial N, manoscritto in preparazione). Per tale ragione abbiamo voluto chiarire quale ruolo giochi Opa1 in questi sottoinsiemi di cellule di cancro. Al fine di verificare se la sovraespressione di Opa1 contribuisca allo sviluppo e alla progressione del cancro in vivo, abbiamo utilizzato un modello noto e caratterizzato di linfoma in topo, il topo transgenico Eμ-myc (Adams et al., 1985). I topi Eμ-myc sono stati ulteriormente incrociati con un modello murino di sovraespressione Opa1, recentemente generato nel nostro laboratorio (Cogliati et al., 2013). Il risultato di questo incrocio ha generato il modello di topo che abbiamo usato nel nostro studio. In questa Tesi presentiamo prove che Opa1 è processata in forme più brevi nel sottoinsieme di DLBCL caratterizzato dalla sovraespressione di componenti del BCR e che, come risultato, la morfologia mitocondriale, il metabolismo e l’ultrastruttura sono diversi tra i sottoinsiemi BCR e OxPhos. Inoltre, mostriamo anche la prova di una marcata sinergia tra Opa1 e c-Myc in modelli murini transgenici, dove la sovraespressione di Opa1 contribuisce e aggrava lo sviluppo di cancro nel modello murino Eμ-Myc. Il lavoro svolto in questa Tesi mette in evidenza un ruolo per Opa1 nel definire le caratteristiche dei linfomi diffusi a grandi cellule B (DLBCL) e nella progressione dei tumori in vivo. In conclusione, i nostri dati indicano che Opa1 mostra caratteristiche pro-oncogeniche e che può essere presa in considerazione come nuovo bersaglio terapeutico per il trattamento del cancro.
mitochondria, Opa1, cancer, lymphoma, apoptosis, mouse model, DLBCL
In vitro and in vivo study of the role of the mitochondria-shaping protein Opa1 in cancer / Samardzic, Dijana. - (2016 Jan 31).
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
samardzic_dijana_thesis.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Tesi di dottorato
Licenza: Non specificato
Dimensione 19.4 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
19.4 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3424511
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact