The history of our Universe spans 13.7 billions of years and could be divided into several stages from the Big Bang up to now. Around 370 000 years after the Big Bang (z~1100) the temperature of the Universe low- ered enough for the first simple atoms to form. Matter and radiation decoupled, and the Universe became transparent to radiation. Cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons that we detect nowadays were last scattered at z~1100 and, since then, have been traveling in straight line. This is the reason why CMB is usually defined as the picture of the Universe at that redshift. Right after the CMB was emitted, the Universe entered the so called Dark Ages when no sources of light exist. Studying the early Universe, one of the most important phases is the subsequent phase-transition named reionization, i.e. the process that reionized the matter in the Universe after the formation of the first sources of light, namely the first stars and galaxies. Consequently, the detection and study of these objects are the key to unveil the early stages of the history of the Universe. Imaging plays a more important role than spectroscopy in searching for high-redshift galaxies because it permits to observe more objects at the same time, better managing the telescope time. Deep surveys, obtained by observing the same sky area for several days, are the answer to the need for detections of high-redshift galaxies. This thesis is focused on the study of the galaxy population existing when the Universe was less than 1.5 Gyr old. When studying the early Universe, the detection of high-redshift sources depends strongly on the detection limit of the survey and the surface brightness of the objects themselves. Taking this into account, we made use of the deepest datasets currently available obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in both the optical and near-infrared (NIR) domain to carefully study how these two issues affect the identification and photometry of high-redshift galaxies. The important role played by high-redshift galaxies in cosmic reionization is no longer debated and, lately, most of studies agreed on the key relevance of galaxies that are below the current detection limit. While we are waiting for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to directly observe these faint galaxies, finding an alternative way to estimate their overall light contribution is mandatory. To this aim we developed a technique based on the power spectrum to analyze background fluctuations. Relying on a Lyman break-like approach we compared the power spectra of background signal derived from observations obtained in two adjacent bands to identify the light contribution from a population of galaxies lying within a specific redshift range. Then, Monte Carlo simulations permitted us to disentangle the information embedded in the light excess identified via power spectra, in particular deriving a constraint on the faint-end slope of the luminosity function. The UDF05 dataset, follow-up of the original Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), consists in observations in the optical bands obtained with the Advanced Camera for Survey (ACS). It permitted us to constrain the slope of the luminosity function at z~6 (0.95 Gyr after the Big Bang), which turned out the be steep enough to allow bright and faint galaxies at that redshift to account for the ionizing photon budget required for cosmic reionization. The subsequent analysis aimed at deriving similar constraints on the faint-end slope of the luminosity function at z~7-8 (between 0.64 and 0.77 Gyr after the Big Bang) using deep observations in the near-infrared obtained with the infrared channel of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3-IR) during the HUDF09 program. Regarding z ∼ 8, the quality of the NIR dataset did not permit to disentangle any light produced by the faint galaxy population from the background noise and spurious signals. On the basis of the drop in the star formation rate density from z~6 to z~7 and beyond, there should be a more relevant contribution in terms of photoionizing photons at z~7 than at z~8 and we expected to be able to detect it. Unfortunately, the analysis at z~7 implied dealing with different detectors that are characterized by systematics that can not be erased by simply considering the ratio of the power spectra. Up to now the understanding of all WFC3/IR related problems is not as good as for ACS and a fur- ther analysis is needed before being able to use the IR dataset for the analysis of surface brightness fluctuations. Since a perfect reduction procedure of the images turned out to be an essential requirement to study any background signal, we performed an advanced data reduction to get an improved version of the deepest image of the Universe currently available, the so called eXtreme Deep Field (XDF). The goal was to create an image that allows to verify our findings on the faint-end slope of the luminosity function at z~6 since the XDF did not permit us to get any constraint on background fluctuations. We started from raw frames obtained from several proposals over 10 years and created hyperbiases and hyperdarks taking into account all the issues affecting ACS data, including the minor ones such as the herringbone effect. Then, we masked the satellite trails, aligned all the frames, and corrected for the chip-to-chip jump. We are still working on the dataset, in particular we are focused on modelling and correcting for the electronic ghost. Anyway, the preliminary check on photometry suggests a promising, even though small, achievement in term of signal to noise of the sources. The effect of surface brightness on the detection of primordial galaxies in deep surveys is directly depending on the cosmological surface brightness dimming that can be express in the form (1 + z)−4 and that affects all the sources. The strong dependence of surface brightness dimming with increasing redshift suggests the presence of a selection bias when searching for high-redshift galaxies, i.e. we tend to detect only those galaxies with a high surface brightness. Unresolved knots of emission are not affected by surface brightness dimming, thus allowing, in principle, to test clumpiness within high-redshift galaxies. We followed an empirical approach based on HST legacy datasets characterized by different depth to study the surface brightness dimming of galaxies. We selected a sample of Lyman-break galaxies at z~4 (1.5 Gyr after the Big Bang) detected in the XDF, HUDF, and the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) datasets and found no significant trend when comparing the total magnitudes measured from images with different depth. Then, we compared our results to the prediction for mock sources derived from Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, considering different surface brightness profiles for the mock galaxies we were able to rule out all the extended profiles as fit for our data, getting a confirmation on the clumpy distribution of the light in high-redshift galaxies. The study of cosmological surface brightness dimming is also important since it could affect our prediction of what the upcoming JWST can observe at higher redshifts, where younger galaxies may exhibit a larger fraction of clumpiness. Our direct comparison showing that galaxies detected in GOODS do not become significantly brighter in the HUDF suggests that most of their light is compact and hints to the fact that JWST will likely not find diffuse star forming components. Finally, to complete the study on high-redshift galaxies we also focused on lower-redshift galaxies that could enter the high-redshift sample due to photometric scatter. In general interlopers are galaxies at z~1-2 showing colors similar to those of real dropout galaxies due to the 4000 A break. Even though their colors are likely to include them in the dropout sample, contaminants have a non negligible detection in the bands blueward of the Lyman-break. The preliminary study we performed using the multi-wavelength catalog obtained from CANDELS GOODS-South shows that the number counts of contaminants are significantly different from those of dropout galaxies at z~5-6 suggesting a clear difference in the luminosity functions of the two populations and little or no evolution in the population of interlopers entering the sample at different redshifts. Finally, we used the 3D-HST catalogs for the GOODS-South field that provided us with photometric data in ground based, HST, and Spitzer/IRAC bands as well as with photometric redshfits. This catalog allowed a study on the interlopers at z~4-5.

I 13.7 miliardi di anni di storia dell’Universo possono essere suddivisi in diverse fasi a partire dal Big Bang fino ad arrivare al giorno d’oggi. Dopo l’emissione della radiazione cosmica di fondo (CMB) avvenuta 370 000 anni dopo il Big Bang (z~1100), in seguito al disaccoppiamento fra materia e radiazione l’Universo e' divenuto trasparente a quest’ultima dando inizio alla fase chiamata eta' oscura (“Dark Ages”), durante cui non era presente alcuna sorgente di luce. Nello studio dell’Universo primordiale riveste un ruolo chiave lo studio della transizione di fase, nota come reionizzazione, avvenuta in seguito alla nascita delle prime stelle e galassie. Lo studio delle prime sorgenti di luce che hanno popolato l’Universo e', quindi, la chiave per scoprire l’Universo primordiale e capirne l’evoluzione. La ricerca di galassie ad alto redshift ha ottenuto una spinta fondamentale grazie alla fotometria e alle tecniche basate sull’acquisizione di immagini che, a differenza della spettroscopia, permettono lo studio simultaneo di piu` oggetti, ottimizzando il tempo di osservazione con i telescopi. In particolare le survey profonde, ottenute osservando la medesima regione di cielo per piu' giorni, sono la risposta alla necessita' di identificare il maggior numero possibile di oggetti. Questa tesi e' focalizzata sullo studio delle prime galassie, gia' formate a meno di 1.5 miliardi di anni dal Big Bang. Lo studio dell’Universo primordiale dipende fortemente sia dal limite in magnitudine delle survey che dalla brillanza superficiale delle galassie che vogliamo osservare. Per caratterizzare l’effetto di entrambi questi fattori, in questa tesi abbiamo analizzato dati ottenuti con il telescopio spaziale Hubble (HST) sia nelle bande ottiche, che in quelle del vicino infrarosso (IR). L’obiettivo del nostro studio e' stato capire come questi effetti influiscano e limitino l’identificazione e la caratterizzazione fotometrica delle galassie ad alto redshift. Il ruolo chiave giocato dalle prime galassie nell’ambito del processo di reionizzazione e' ormai assodato, ma studi recenti hanno mostrato come le galassie meno brillanti, e dunque al di sotto dell’attuale limite di osservabilita', possano aver avuto un’importanza maggiore rispetto alle galassie brillanti che sono state identificate fino ad ora. In attesa che il telescopio spaziale James Webb (JWST) possa osservare direttamente queste galassie poco brillanti, e' fondamentale trovare un modo alternativo per stimare quale sia il con- tributo di luce totale proveniente da questi oggetti. Proprio a tale scopo abbiamo sviluppato una tecnica, basata sull’utilizzo dello spettro di potenza, per analizzare le fluttuazioni del segnale di background. Basandoci su un approccio simile al tecnica del Lyman-break, utilizzata comunemente per l’identificazione di galassie ad alto redshift, abbiamo confrontato lo spettro di potenza del segnale di fondo in due bande adiacenti per isolare la luce prodotta da una popolazione di galassie deboli entro un ristretto intervallo di redshift. Grazie ad una serie di simulazioni di tipo Monte Carlo siamo riusciti a ricavare dall’eccesso di segnale nella banda piu' rossa un vincolo sulla pendenza α della funzione di luminosita' alle magnitudini piu' deboli. In particolare, utilizzando i dati del progetto UDF05, continuazione del programma Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), siamo riusciti ad ottenere un valore della pendenza α della funzione di luminosita' a magnitudini deboli a z~6 (corrispondente a 0.95 miliardi di anni dopo il Big Bang). I valori di α = −1.8 e α = −1.9 che abbiamo ottenuto tenendo o meno conto del clustering sono tali da permetterci di dire che la quantita' di fotoni ionizzanti prodotti da tutte le galassie a z~6 e' sufficiente a giustificare il processo di reionizzazione dell’idrogeno nell’Universo. L’analisi che abbiamo condotto successivamente e' indirizzata ad ottenere un valore di α a redshift piu' alto, nello specifico z~7-8 (corrispondenti, rispettivamente, a 0.64 e 0.77 miliardi di anni dopo il Big Bang). Con questo obiettivo abbiamo fatto uso delle osservazioni profonde ottenute nell’ambito del programma HUDF09 nel vicino infrarosso. Per quanto riguarda z~8, la qualita' delle immagini infrarosse non ci ha permesso di isolare alcun segnale prodotto dalle galassie deboli dal rumore di fondo e da segnali spuri. Sulla base del crollo della densita' del tasso di formazione stellare andando da z ~6 a redshift piu' alti il contributo, in termini di fotoni ionizzanti, delle galassie a z~7 dovrebbe essere maggiore rispetto a quello della popolazione a z~8 e quindi ci aspettavamo che isolare un segnale prodotto da quelle galassie fosse piu' facile che a z~8. In realta', pero', l’analisi a z~7 prevede il confronto di dati ottenuti con strumenti diversi, caratterizzati da problemi diversi ed effetti sistematici che non vengono eliminati semplicemente con- siderando il rapporto fra gli spettri di potenza, come accade, invece, nel caso di immagini ottenute con la stessa camera. Inoltre, al momento, la nostra conoscenza dei problemi della camera infrarossa Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3/IR) di HST non e' ancora allo stesso livello di quella relativa alla camera Advanced Camera for Survey (ACS) ed e', quindi, necessario un ulteriore e piu' approfondito studio sugli effetti legati allo strumento prima di poter usare i dati infrarossi per lo studio delle fluttuazioni di background. Avendo constatato che una perfetta procedura di riduzione dei dati costituisce un requisito essenziale per poter studiare le fluttuazioni di background e, quindi, il segnale proveniente dalle galassie meno brillanti, il passo successivo e' stato ottenere una versione migliorata dell’immagine piu' profonda dell’Universo attualmente disponibile ottenuta nell’ambito del progetto eXtreme Deep Field (XDF). Il nostro obiettivo era di ottenere un’immagine tale da permetterci di verificare i nostri risultati sulla pendenza della funzione di luminosita' a z~6 dato che l’XDF non ci ha permesso di individuare alcuna fluttuazione nel segnale di fondo. Il nostro lavoro e' iniziato acquisendo dall’archivio le immagini non ridotte ottenute in di- versi progetti durante un arco temporale di 10 anni e creando i nostri hyperbias e hyperdark. In questo abbiamo potuto tenere in considerazione tutte le problematiche legate alla camera ACS, anche quelle minori, come l’herringbone effect, che spesso non vengono corrette dalla normale pipeline di riduzione dati. Successivamente abbiamo mascherato le tracce dei satelliti, allineato tutte le immagini e corretto per la differenze di livello di fondo esistenti fra un chip e l’altro. Al momento stiamo ancora lavorando su queste immagini, nello specifico con l’idea di modellare i ghost elettronici e correggere le immagini per questo problema. I test preliminari sulla fotometria delle nostre immagini sono promettenti e suggeriscono che ci sia un leggero guadagno in termini di rapporto segnale-rumore rispetto alla versione originale dell’XDF, ma solo un ulteriore lavoro ci permettera' di ottenere le immagini finali. La brillanza superficiale incide direttamente sull’identificazione di galassie primordiali in immagini profonde sulla base dall’effetto noto come dimming cosmologico. Questo consiste in una diminuzione della brillanza superficiale di tutti gli oggetti astronomici e- stesi che scala con il redshift stesso di un fattore (1+z)^4. La forte dipendenza dell’effetto dal redshift suggerisce un effetto di selezione per il quale si individuerebbero più' facilmente le galassie primordiali con un’alta brillanza superficiale rispetto a quelle piu' deboli. Va notato che, siccome l’effetto del dimming si ha soltanto su oggetti estesi, essendo legato alla brillanza superficiale, la ricerca di tracce di questo effetto puo' essere utilizzata per testare quale sia la distribuzione di luce nelle sorgenti ad alto redshift. Nello specifico il dimming puo' aiutare a capire se l’emissione di luce sia concentrata in strutture compatte o meno. Nel nostro studio abbiamo adottato un approccio empirico, confrontando dati provenienti da survey con profondita' diversa, ma ottenute tutte con lo stesso strumento, in particolare HST/ACS. Abbiamo concentrato la nostra attenzione su un campione di galassie a z~4 (corrispondente a 1.5 miliardi di anni dopo il Big Bang) identificate nelle immagini XDF, HUDF e GOODS e, confrontando le magnitudini totali derivate dalle diverse survey, non e' emerso alcun andamento nei dati che fosse imputabile al dimming cosmologico. Per completare il lavoro abbiamo, poi, effettuato delle simulazioni Monte Carlo per ricavare quale sarebbe il riscontro sui dati se il dimming fosse in atto a secondo del tipo di dis- tribuzione di luce nelle galassie ad alto redshift. Confrontando i risultati delle simulazioni con quelli ricavati dai dati e' stato possibile escludere i profili di brillanza superficiale caratteristici delle sorgenti estese. I nostri dati sono, quindi, in accordo con una distribuzione della formazione stellare ad alto redshift in strutture compatte, come sostenuto anche da altri gruppi di ricerca. In generale lo studio degli effetti del dimming cosmologico riveste un ruolo molto importante nella determinazione del tipo di oggetti che JWST potra' osservare. Essendo in grado di spingere il nostro orizzonte verso fasi della storia dell’Universo ancora piu' vicine al Big Bang, JWST permettera' di verificare in maniera piu' accurata sia la distribuzione della luce nelle galassie primordiali sia il contributo proveniente dalle sorgenti che al momento non riusciamo a vedere singolamente. Infine, per completare il nostro studio sulle galassie ad alto redshift abbiamo preso in considerazione gli oggetti a z~1-2 che possono contaminare i cataloghi di galassie primordiali. Lo spettro di questi oggetti mostra un break a 4000 A che puo' portarli ad avere dei colori molto simili a quelli delle vere galassie ad alto redshift. Cio' che distingue i contaminanti dalle vere galassie primordiali e' l’essere chiaramente identificabili nelle bande piu' blu del Lyman-break. Lo studio preliminare che e' stato condotto sulla base di due cataloghi pubblici multi- banda di tutte le sorgenti presenti nel campo GOODS-South mostra che la distribuzione del numero di contaminanti e delle vere galassie primordiali e' diversa nell’intervallo di redshift che abbiamo analizzato (z~4-5-6). Questo suggerisce che la popolazione contaminante abbia una funzione di luminosita' differente rispetto alle galassie ad alto redshift. Inoltre, si ricava dai dati che la distribuzione dei conteggi di contaminanti a basso red- shift mostra solo una leggera, se non assente, evoluzione. La popolazione contaminante e', quindi, sempre all’incirca la stessa, e questo e' confermato dal leggero spostamento del break a 4000 A richiesto perche' questi oggetti soddisfino i criteri di selezione in colore delle galassie a z ≥ 4. Anche i redshift fotometrici sono in accordo con l’ipotesi che i contaminanti siano oggetti a redshift piu' basso. Una piu' completa caratterizzazione della popolazione delle galassie che hanno colori simili a quelle primordiali sara' possibile quando nuovi cataloghi saranno resi disponibili.

Searching for High-redshift Galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope Deep Data / Calvi, Valentina. - (2014 Jul 24).

Searching for High-redshift Galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope Deep Data

Calvi, Valentina
2014-07-24

Abstract

The history of our Universe spans 13.7 billions of years and could be divided into several stages from the Big Bang up to now. Around 370 000 years after the Big Bang (z~1100) the temperature of the Universe low- ered enough for the first simple atoms to form. Matter and radiation decoupled, and the Universe became transparent to radiation. Cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons that we detect nowadays were last scattered at z~1100 and, since then, have been traveling in straight line. This is the reason why CMB is usually defined as the picture of the Universe at that redshift. Right after the CMB was emitted, the Universe entered the so called Dark Ages when no sources of light exist. Studying the early Universe, one of the most important phases is the subsequent phase-transition named reionization, i.e. the process that reionized the matter in the Universe after the formation of the first sources of light, namely the first stars and galaxies. Consequently, the detection and study of these objects are the key to unveil the early stages of the history of the Universe. Imaging plays a more important role than spectroscopy in searching for high-redshift galaxies because it permits to observe more objects at the same time, better managing the telescope time. Deep surveys, obtained by observing the same sky area for several days, are the answer to the need for detections of high-redshift galaxies. This thesis is focused on the study of the galaxy population existing when the Universe was less than 1.5 Gyr old. When studying the early Universe, the detection of high-redshift sources depends strongly on the detection limit of the survey and the surface brightness of the objects themselves. Taking this into account, we made use of the deepest datasets currently available obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in both the optical and near-infrared (NIR) domain to carefully study how these two issues affect the identification and photometry of high-redshift galaxies. The important role played by high-redshift galaxies in cosmic reionization is no longer debated and, lately, most of studies agreed on the key relevance of galaxies that are below the current detection limit. While we are waiting for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to directly observe these faint galaxies, finding an alternative way to estimate their overall light contribution is mandatory. To this aim we developed a technique based on the power spectrum to analyze background fluctuations. Relying on a Lyman break-like approach we compared the power spectra of background signal derived from observations obtained in two adjacent bands to identify the light contribution from a population of galaxies lying within a specific redshift range. Then, Monte Carlo simulations permitted us to disentangle the information embedded in the light excess identified via power spectra, in particular deriving a constraint on the faint-end slope of the luminosity function. The UDF05 dataset, follow-up of the original Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), consists in observations in the optical bands obtained with the Advanced Camera for Survey (ACS). It permitted us to constrain the slope of the luminosity function at z~6 (0.95 Gyr after the Big Bang), which turned out the be steep enough to allow bright and faint galaxies at that redshift to account for the ionizing photon budget required for cosmic reionization. The subsequent analysis aimed at deriving similar constraints on the faint-end slope of the luminosity function at z~7-8 (between 0.64 and 0.77 Gyr after the Big Bang) using deep observations in the near-infrared obtained with the infrared channel of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3-IR) during the HUDF09 program. Regarding z ∼ 8, the quality of the NIR dataset did not permit to disentangle any light produced by the faint galaxy population from the background noise and spurious signals. On the basis of the drop in the star formation rate density from z~6 to z~7 and beyond, there should be a more relevant contribution in terms of photoionizing photons at z~7 than at z~8 and we expected to be able to detect it. Unfortunately, the analysis at z~7 implied dealing with different detectors that are characterized by systematics that can not be erased by simply considering the ratio of the power spectra. Up to now the understanding of all WFC3/IR related problems is not as good as for ACS and a fur- ther analysis is needed before being able to use the IR dataset for the analysis of surface brightness fluctuations. Since a perfect reduction procedure of the images turned out to be an essential requirement to study any background signal, we performed an advanced data reduction to get an improved version of the deepest image of the Universe currently available, the so called eXtreme Deep Field (XDF). The goal was to create an image that allows to verify our findings on the faint-end slope of the luminosity function at z~6 since the XDF did not permit us to get any constraint on background fluctuations. We started from raw frames obtained from several proposals over 10 years and created hyperbiases and hyperdarks taking into account all the issues affecting ACS data, including the minor ones such as the herringbone effect. Then, we masked the satellite trails, aligned all the frames, and corrected for the chip-to-chip jump. We are still working on the dataset, in particular we are focused on modelling and correcting for the electronic ghost. Anyway, the preliminary check on photometry suggests a promising, even though small, achievement in term of signal to noise of the sources. The effect of surface brightness on the detection of primordial galaxies in deep surveys is directly depending on the cosmological surface brightness dimming that can be express in the form (1 + z)−4 and that affects all the sources. The strong dependence of surface brightness dimming with increasing redshift suggests the presence of a selection bias when searching for high-redshift galaxies, i.e. we tend to detect only those galaxies with a high surface brightness. Unresolved knots of emission are not affected by surface brightness dimming, thus allowing, in principle, to test clumpiness within high-redshift galaxies. We followed an empirical approach based on HST legacy datasets characterized by different depth to study the surface brightness dimming of galaxies. We selected a sample of Lyman-break galaxies at z~4 (1.5 Gyr after the Big Bang) detected in the XDF, HUDF, and the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) datasets and found no significant trend when comparing the total magnitudes measured from images with different depth. Then, we compared our results to the prediction for mock sources derived from Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, considering different surface brightness profiles for the mock galaxies we were able to rule out all the extended profiles as fit for our data, getting a confirmation on the clumpy distribution of the light in high-redshift galaxies. The study of cosmological surface brightness dimming is also important since it could affect our prediction of what the upcoming JWST can observe at higher redshifts, where younger galaxies may exhibit a larger fraction of clumpiness. Our direct comparison showing that galaxies detected in GOODS do not become significantly brighter in the HUDF suggests that most of their light is compact and hints to the fact that JWST will likely not find diffuse star forming components. Finally, to complete the study on high-redshift galaxies we also focused on lower-redshift galaxies that could enter the high-redshift sample due to photometric scatter. In general interlopers are galaxies at z~1-2 showing colors similar to those of real dropout galaxies due to the 4000 A break. Even though their colors are likely to include them in the dropout sample, contaminants have a non negligible detection in the bands blueward of the Lyman-break. The preliminary study we performed using the multi-wavelength catalog obtained from CANDELS GOODS-South shows that the number counts of contaminants are significantly different from those of dropout galaxies at z~5-6 suggesting a clear difference in the luminosity functions of the two populations and little or no evolution in the population of interlopers entering the sample at different redshifts. Finally, we used the 3D-HST catalogs for the GOODS-South field that provided us with photometric data in ground based, HST, and Spitzer/IRAC bands as well as with photometric redshfits. This catalog allowed a study on the interlopers at z~4-5.
I 13.7 miliardi di anni di storia dell’Universo possono essere suddivisi in diverse fasi a partire dal Big Bang fino ad arrivare al giorno d’oggi. Dopo l’emissione della radiazione cosmica di fondo (CMB) avvenuta 370 000 anni dopo il Big Bang (z~1100), in seguito al disaccoppiamento fra materia e radiazione l’Universo e' divenuto trasparente a quest’ultima dando inizio alla fase chiamata eta' oscura (“Dark Ages”), durante cui non era presente alcuna sorgente di luce. Nello studio dell’Universo primordiale riveste un ruolo chiave lo studio della transizione di fase, nota come reionizzazione, avvenuta in seguito alla nascita delle prime stelle e galassie. Lo studio delle prime sorgenti di luce che hanno popolato l’Universo e', quindi, la chiave per scoprire l’Universo primordiale e capirne l’evoluzione. La ricerca di galassie ad alto redshift ha ottenuto una spinta fondamentale grazie alla fotometria e alle tecniche basate sull’acquisizione di immagini che, a differenza della spettroscopia, permettono lo studio simultaneo di piu` oggetti, ottimizzando il tempo di osservazione con i telescopi. In particolare le survey profonde, ottenute osservando la medesima regione di cielo per piu' giorni, sono la risposta alla necessita' di identificare il maggior numero possibile di oggetti. Questa tesi e' focalizzata sullo studio delle prime galassie, gia' formate a meno di 1.5 miliardi di anni dal Big Bang. Lo studio dell’Universo primordiale dipende fortemente sia dal limite in magnitudine delle survey che dalla brillanza superficiale delle galassie che vogliamo osservare. Per caratterizzare l’effetto di entrambi questi fattori, in questa tesi abbiamo analizzato dati ottenuti con il telescopio spaziale Hubble (HST) sia nelle bande ottiche, che in quelle del vicino infrarosso (IR). L’obiettivo del nostro studio e' stato capire come questi effetti influiscano e limitino l’identificazione e la caratterizzazione fotometrica delle galassie ad alto redshift. Il ruolo chiave giocato dalle prime galassie nell’ambito del processo di reionizzazione e' ormai assodato, ma studi recenti hanno mostrato come le galassie meno brillanti, e dunque al di sotto dell’attuale limite di osservabilita', possano aver avuto un’importanza maggiore rispetto alle galassie brillanti che sono state identificate fino ad ora. In attesa che il telescopio spaziale James Webb (JWST) possa osservare direttamente queste galassie poco brillanti, e' fondamentale trovare un modo alternativo per stimare quale sia il con- tributo di luce totale proveniente da questi oggetti. Proprio a tale scopo abbiamo sviluppato una tecnica, basata sull’utilizzo dello spettro di potenza, per analizzare le fluttuazioni del segnale di background. Basandoci su un approccio simile al tecnica del Lyman-break, utilizzata comunemente per l’identificazione di galassie ad alto redshift, abbiamo confrontato lo spettro di potenza del segnale di fondo in due bande adiacenti per isolare la luce prodotta da una popolazione di galassie deboli entro un ristretto intervallo di redshift. Grazie ad una serie di simulazioni di tipo Monte Carlo siamo riusciti a ricavare dall’eccesso di segnale nella banda piu' rossa un vincolo sulla pendenza α della funzione di luminosita' alle magnitudini piu' deboli. In particolare, utilizzando i dati del progetto UDF05, continuazione del programma Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), siamo riusciti ad ottenere un valore della pendenza α della funzione di luminosita' a magnitudini deboli a z~6 (corrispondente a 0.95 miliardi di anni dopo il Big Bang). I valori di α = −1.8 e α = −1.9 che abbiamo ottenuto tenendo o meno conto del clustering sono tali da permetterci di dire che la quantita' di fotoni ionizzanti prodotti da tutte le galassie a z~6 e' sufficiente a giustificare il processo di reionizzazione dell’idrogeno nell’Universo. L’analisi che abbiamo condotto successivamente e' indirizzata ad ottenere un valore di α a redshift piu' alto, nello specifico z~7-8 (corrispondenti, rispettivamente, a 0.64 e 0.77 miliardi di anni dopo il Big Bang). Con questo obiettivo abbiamo fatto uso delle osservazioni profonde ottenute nell’ambito del programma HUDF09 nel vicino infrarosso. Per quanto riguarda z~8, la qualita' delle immagini infrarosse non ci ha permesso di isolare alcun segnale prodotto dalle galassie deboli dal rumore di fondo e da segnali spuri. Sulla base del crollo della densita' del tasso di formazione stellare andando da z ~6 a redshift piu' alti il contributo, in termini di fotoni ionizzanti, delle galassie a z~7 dovrebbe essere maggiore rispetto a quello della popolazione a z~8 e quindi ci aspettavamo che isolare un segnale prodotto da quelle galassie fosse piu' facile che a z~8. In realta', pero', l’analisi a z~7 prevede il confronto di dati ottenuti con strumenti diversi, caratterizzati da problemi diversi ed effetti sistematici che non vengono eliminati semplicemente con- siderando il rapporto fra gli spettri di potenza, come accade, invece, nel caso di immagini ottenute con la stessa camera. Inoltre, al momento, la nostra conoscenza dei problemi della camera infrarossa Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3/IR) di HST non e' ancora allo stesso livello di quella relativa alla camera Advanced Camera for Survey (ACS) ed e', quindi, necessario un ulteriore e piu' approfondito studio sugli effetti legati allo strumento prima di poter usare i dati infrarossi per lo studio delle fluttuazioni di background. Avendo constatato che una perfetta procedura di riduzione dei dati costituisce un requisito essenziale per poter studiare le fluttuazioni di background e, quindi, il segnale proveniente dalle galassie meno brillanti, il passo successivo e' stato ottenere una versione migliorata dell’immagine piu' profonda dell’Universo attualmente disponibile ottenuta nell’ambito del progetto eXtreme Deep Field (XDF). Il nostro obiettivo era di ottenere un’immagine tale da permetterci di verificare i nostri risultati sulla pendenza della funzione di luminosita' a z~6 dato che l’XDF non ci ha permesso di individuare alcuna fluttuazione nel segnale di fondo. Il nostro lavoro e' iniziato acquisendo dall’archivio le immagini non ridotte ottenute in di- versi progetti durante un arco temporale di 10 anni e creando i nostri hyperbias e hyperdark. In questo abbiamo potuto tenere in considerazione tutte le problematiche legate alla camera ACS, anche quelle minori, come l’herringbone effect, che spesso non vengono corrette dalla normale pipeline di riduzione dati. Successivamente abbiamo mascherato le tracce dei satelliti, allineato tutte le immagini e corretto per la differenze di livello di fondo esistenti fra un chip e l’altro. Al momento stiamo ancora lavorando su queste immagini, nello specifico con l’idea di modellare i ghost elettronici e correggere le immagini per questo problema. I test preliminari sulla fotometria delle nostre immagini sono promettenti e suggeriscono che ci sia un leggero guadagno in termini di rapporto segnale-rumore rispetto alla versione originale dell’XDF, ma solo un ulteriore lavoro ci permettera' di ottenere le immagini finali. La brillanza superficiale incide direttamente sull’identificazione di galassie primordiali in immagini profonde sulla base dall’effetto noto come dimming cosmologico. Questo consiste in una diminuzione della brillanza superficiale di tutti gli oggetti astronomici e- stesi che scala con il redshift stesso di un fattore (1+z)^4. La forte dipendenza dell’effetto dal redshift suggerisce un effetto di selezione per il quale si individuerebbero più' facilmente le galassie primordiali con un’alta brillanza superficiale rispetto a quelle piu' deboli. Va notato che, siccome l’effetto del dimming si ha soltanto su oggetti estesi, essendo legato alla brillanza superficiale, la ricerca di tracce di questo effetto puo' essere utilizzata per testare quale sia la distribuzione di luce nelle sorgenti ad alto redshift. Nello specifico il dimming puo' aiutare a capire se l’emissione di luce sia concentrata in strutture compatte o meno. Nel nostro studio abbiamo adottato un approccio empirico, confrontando dati provenienti da survey con profondita' diversa, ma ottenute tutte con lo stesso strumento, in particolare HST/ACS. Abbiamo concentrato la nostra attenzione su un campione di galassie a z~4 (corrispondente a 1.5 miliardi di anni dopo il Big Bang) identificate nelle immagini XDF, HUDF e GOODS e, confrontando le magnitudini totali derivate dalle diverse survey, non e' emerso alcun andamento nei dati che fosse imputabile al dimming cosmologico. Per completare il lavoro abbiamo, poi, effettuato delle simulazioni Monte Carlo per ricavare quale sarebbe il riscontro sui dati se il dimming fosse in atto a secondo del tipo di dis- tribuzione di luce nelle galassie ad alto redshift. Confrontando i risultati delle simulazioni con quelli ricavati dai dati e' stato possibile escludere i profili di brillanza superficiale caratteristici delle sorgenti estese. I nostri dati sono, quindi, in accordo con una distribuzione della formazione stellare ad alto redshift in strutture compatte, come sostenuto anche da altri gruppi di ricerca. In generale lo studio degli effetti del dimming cosmologico riveste un ruolo molto importante nella determinazione del tipo di oggetti che JWST potra' osservare. Essendo in grado di spingere il nostro orizzonte verso fasi della storia dell’Universo ancora piu' vicine al Big Bang, JWST permettera' di verificare in maniera piu' accurata sia la distribuzione della luce nelle galassie primordiali sia il contributo proveniente dalle sorgenti che al momento non riusciamo a vedere singolamente. Infine, per completare il nostro studio sulle galassie ad alto redshift abbiamo preso in considerazione gli oggetti a z~1-2 che possono contaminare i cataloghi di galassie primordiali. Lo spettro di questi oggetti mostra un break a 4000 A che puo' portarli ad avere dei colori molto simili a quelli delle vere galassie ad alto redshift. Cio' che distingue i contaminanti dalle vere galassie primordiali e' l’essere chiaramente identificabili nelle bande piu' blu del Lyman-break. Lo studio preliminare che e' stato condotto sulla base di due cataloghi pubblici multi- banda di tutte le sorgenti presenti nel campo GOODS-South mostra che la distribuzione del numero di contaminanti e delle vere galassie primordiali e' diversa nell’intervallo di redshift che abbiamo analizzato (z~4-5-6). Questo suggerisce che la popolazione contaminante abbia una funzione di luminosita' differente rispetto alle galassie ad alto redshift. Inoltre, si ricava dai dati che la distribuzione dei conteggi di contaminanti a basso red- shift mostra solo una leggera, se non assente, evoluzione. La popolazione contaminante e', quindi, sempre all’incirca la stessa, e questo e' confermato dal leggero spostamento del break a 4000 A richiesto perche' questi oggetti soddisfino i criteri di selezione in colore delle galassie a z ≥ 4. Anche i redshift fotometrici sono in accordo con l’ipotesi che i contaminanti siano oggetti a redshift piu' basso. Una piu' completa caratterizzazione della popolazione delle galassie che hanno colori simili a quelle primordiali sara' possibile quando nuovi cataloghi saranno resi disponibili.
Early Universe, Reionization, First Galaxies, High-redshift, Photometry, Hubble Space Telescope Data
Searching for High-redshift Galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope Deep Data / Calvi, Valentina. - (2014 Jul 24).
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
thesis_Valentina_Calvi_2014.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Tesi di dottorato
Licenza: Non specificato
Dimensione 22.99 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
22.99 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3424663
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact