We previously demonstrated that Annexin A2 (ANXA2) is a pivotal mediator of the pro-oncogenic features displayed by glioblastoma (GBM) tumors, the deadliest adult brain malignancies, being involved in cell stemness, proliferation and invasion, thus negatively impacting patient prognosis. Based on these results, we hypothesized that compounds able to revert ANXA2-dependent transcriptional features could be exploited as reliable treatments to inhibit GBM cell aggressiveness by hampering their proliferative and migratory potential. Transcriptional signatures obtained by the modulation of ANXA2 activity/levels were functionally mapped through the QUADrATiC bioinformatic tool for compound identification. Selected compounds were screened by cell proliferation and migration assays in primary GBM cells, and we identified Homoharringtonine (HHT) as a potent inhibitor of GBM cell motility and proliferation, without affecting their viability. A further molecular characterization of the effects displayed by HHT, confirmed its ability to inhibit a transcriptional program involved in cell migration and invasion. Moreover, we demonstrated that the multiple antitumoral effects displayed by HHT are correlated to the inhibition of a platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα)-dependent intracellular signaling through the impairment of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and Ras homolog family member A (RhoA) axes. Our results demonstrate that HHT may act as a potent inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and invasion in GBM, by hampering multiple PDGFRα-dependent oncogenic signals transduced through the STAT3 and RhoA intracellular components, finally suggesting its potential transferability for achieving an effective impairment of peculiar GBM hallmarks.

Identification of Homoharringtonine as a potent inhibitor of glioblastoma cell proliferation and migration

Maule, Francesca;Manfreda, Lorenzo;Mariotto, Elena;Bresolin, Silvia;Cani, Alice;Bortolozzi, Roberta;Corallo, Diana;Viola, Giampietro;Rampazzo, Elena
;
Persano, Luca
2023

Abstract

We previously demonstrated that Annexin A2 (ANXA2) is a pivotal mediator of the pro-oncogenic features displayed by glioblastoma (GBM) tumors, the deadliest adult brain malignancies, being involved in cell stemness, proliferation and invasion, thus negatively impacting patient prognosis. Based on these results, we hypothesized that compounds able to revert ANXA2-dependent transcriptional features could be exploited as reliable treatments to inhibit GBM cell aggressiveness by hampering their proliferative and migratory potential. Transcriptional signatures obtained by the modulation of ANXA2 activity/levels were functionally mapped through the QUADrATiC bioinformatic tool for compound identification. Selected compounds were screened by cell proliferation and migration assays in primary GBM cells, and we identified Homoharringtonine (HHT) as a potent inhibitor of GBM cell motility and proliferation, without affecting their viability. A further molecular characterization of the effects displayed by HHT, confirmed its ability to inhibit a transcriptional program involved in cell migration and invasion. Moreover, we demonstrated that the multiple antitumoral effects displayed by HHT are correlated to the inhibition of a platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα)-dependent intracellular signaling through the impairment of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and Ras homolog family member A (RhoA) axes. Our results demonstrate that HHT may act as a potent inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and invasion in GBM, by hampering multiple PDGFRα-dependent oncogenic signals transduced through the STAT3 and RhoA intracellular components, finally suggesting its potential transferability for achieving an effective impairment of peculiar GBM hallmarks.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3458321
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