Laboratory experiments have been carried out in a large laboratory flume using a nearly uniform sand and under controlled steady flow conditions such as to ensure the development of alternate bars on a ripple and/or dune-covered bed. The interaction between small-scale and large-scale bed forms is found to enhance a modulation in time and in space of the bar pattern. Moreover, the flow depth decrease experienced by the flow field when approaching bar fronts, leading to a progressive reduction of the dimensions of small-scale bed forms, may influence appreciably the overall flow resistance. Experimental values of bar wavelength and of bar celerity are compared with the theoretical estimates obtained from a model developed within the classical framework of linear stability analysis. In particular, the model accounts for the local variability of friction coefficient and water level, for the secondary helical flow effects, and for the influence of longitudinal slope on sediment transport. Quantitatively satisfactory predictions of bar wavelength appear to be possible in spite of the fact that in various runs a correct estimation of flow resistance and flaw discharge appears to be relatively difficult.

Experiments on Bar formation in a straigth flume. Part I: Uniform Sediment

LANZONI, STEFANO
2000

Abstract

Laboratory experiments have been carried out in a large laboratory flume using a nearly uniform sand and under controlled steady flow conditions such as to ensure the development of alternate bars on a ripple and/or dune-covered bed. The interaction between small-scale and large-scale bed forms is found to enhance a modulation in time and in space of the bar pattern. Moreover, the flow depth decrease experienced by the flow field when approaching bar fronts, leading to a progressive reduction of the dimensions of small-scale bed forms, may influence appreciably the overall flow resistance. Experimental values of bar wavelength and of bar celerity are compared with the theoretical estimates obtained from a model developed within the classical framework of linear stability analysis. In particular, the model accounts for the local variability of friction coefficient and water level, for the secondary helical flow effects, and for the influence of longitudinal slope on sediment transport. Quantitatively satisfactory predictions of bar wavelength appear to be possible in spite of the fact that in various runs a correct estimation of flow resistance and flaw discharge appears to be relatively difficult.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/1351108
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