This study examined the roles of learning method, word frequency, and cognate status in the learning of 80 Italian words by 56 adult Dutch learners previously unfamiliar with Italian. We contrasted 2 learning methods: word learning, where the Italian word was presented with its translation in Dutch, and picture learning, where it was presented with a picture depicting its referent. At test, either pictures or the Dutch words constituted the cues for recall of the Italian words. Recall was tested twice: once after 3 learning trials per stimulus, and a second time after an additional 3 learning trials. Two measures served as dependent variables: retrieval times and recall scores. The results show (a) that word learning resulted in better performance than picture learning; (b) that performance was better when the study and test conditions were congruent than it hen they were incongruent; and (c) that cognates and high-frequency words were easier to learn than noncognates and low-frequency words. Particularly noteworthy is that after 6 learning trials performance had not yet become independent of learning method. We discuss the implications of these results for bilingual memory representation and for sequencing curricula for foreign-language learning.

Effects of learning method and word type on acquiring vocabulary in an unfamiliar language

LOTTO, LORELLA;
1998

Abstract

This study examined the roles of learning method, word frequency, and cognate status in the learning of 80 Italian words by 56 adult Dutch learners previously unfamiliar with Italian. We contrasted 2 learning methods: word learning, where the Italian word was presented with its translation in Dutch, and picture learning, where it was presented with a picture depicting its referent. At test, either pictures or the Dutch words constituted the cues for recall of the Italian words. Recall was tested twice: once after 3 learning trials per stimulus, and a second time after an additional 3 learning trials. Two measures served as dependent variables: retrieval times and recall scores. The results show (a) that word learning resulted in better performance than picture learning; (b) that performance was better when the study and test conditions were congruent than it hen they were incongruent; and (c) that cognates and high-frequency words were easier to learn than noncognates and low-frequency words. Particularly noteworthy is that after 6 learning trials performance had not yet become independent of learning method. We discuss the implications of these results for bilingual memory representation and for sequencing curricula for foreign-language learning.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/147234
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