BACKGROUND: The aim of this retrospective analysis was to analyze the results of treatment of patients with cervical node metastases from carcinoma of occult primary with a policy including neck dissection and postoperative comprehensive radiotherapy. METHODS: Ninety patients were treated with curative intent from 1990 to 2002. RESULTS: The actuarial rate of neck disease control was 68.8% at 5 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 58.9%-78.7%). On multivariate analysis, the rate of neck disease control was significantly related to lymph nodal metastatic level (P = .006). The actuarial rate of developing head and neck primary tumors at 5 years was 8.9% (95% CI, 2.6%-15.2%). The 5-year actuarial rate of distant metastases was 19.1% (95% CI, 9.4%-28.9%). In multivariate analysis, a statistically significant difference in the rate of distant metastasis was obtained when patients were stratified according to the level of nodal involvement (P = .01) and the presence of extracapsular extension (P = .013). At the time of analysis, 50 of the 90 patients were alive. A total of 32 (35.6%) had died from causes related to their primary disease. Actuarial disease-specific survival at 2 and 5 years was 73.6% (95% CI, 64.3%-82.9%) and 62.8% (95% CI, 51.9%-73.7%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, a statistically significant difference in disease-specific survival was obtained when patients were stratified according to the level of nodal involvement and the presence of extracapsular extension. CONCLUSIONS: Our study seems to support the use of combined-modality therapy in patients with neck metastases from carcinoma of occult primary. However, in the absence of randomized trials, comprehensive irradiation cannot be routinely advised.

CARCINOMA METASTATIC TO CERVICAL LYMPH NODES FROM AN OCCULT PRIMARY TUMOR: THE OUTCOME AFTER COMBINED-MODALITY THERAPY

BOSCOLO RIZZO, PAOLO;DA MOSTO, MARIA CRISTINA
2007

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this retrospective analysis was to analyze the results of treatment of patients with cervical node metastases from carcinoma of occult primary with a policy including neck dissection and postoperative comprehensive radiotherapy. METHODS: Ninety patients were treated with curative intent from 1990 to 2002. RESULTS: The actuarial rate of neck disease control was 68.8% at 5 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 58.9%-78.7%). On multivariate analysis, the rate of neck disease control was significantly related to lymph nodal metastatic level (P = .006). The actuarial rate of developing head and neck primary tumors at 5 years was 8.9% (95% CI, 2.6%-15.2%). The 5-year actuarial rate of distant metastases was 19.1% (95% CI, 9.4%-28.9%). In multivariate analysis, a statistically significant difference in the rate of distant metastasis was obtained when patients were stratified according to the level of nodal involvement (P = .01) and the presence of extracapsular extension (P = .013). At the time of analysis, 50 of the 90 patients were alive. A total of 32 (35.6%) had died from causes related to their primary disease. Actuarial disease-specific survival at 2 and 5 years was 73.6% (95% CI, 64.3%-82.9%) and 62.8% (95% CI, 51.9%-73.7%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, a statistically significant difference in disease-specific survival was obtained when patients were stratified according to the level of nodal involvement and the presence of extracapsular extension. CONCLUSIONS: Our study seems to support the use of combined-modality therapy in patients with neck metastases from carcinoma of occult primary. However, in the absence of randomized trials, comprehensive irradiation cannot be routinely advised.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2430231
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