AIM: (1) To compare the prevalence of osteoporosis (t-score < or =-2.5 SD) between stage IV PBC patients, and two groups of age- and sex-matched controls: one with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis, and the other one consisting of a group of healthy subjects from the general population; (2) to identify the main risk factors for the development of bone loss. METHODS: Thirty-five stage IV PBC patients (mean age 52.5+/-10 years), 49 females with HCV-related cirrhosis (mean age 52.9+/-5.8 years) and 33 healthy females (mean age 51.8+/-2.22 years) were enrolled in the study. Bone metabolism was evaluated by measuring serum calcium corrected for serum albumin (Ca corr.), 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OH vit D), parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed at the lumbar spine by dual-photon X-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS: Osteoporosis was present in 5/35 PBC patients (14.2%) and in 7/49 HCV-related cirrhotic patients (14.3%), without any statistical difference between the two groups. Among healthy control subjects, none had osteoporosis. No difference was found between the three groups in serum parameters of bone metabolism. Univariate analysis showed that menopausal state and low BMI were significantly correlated with osteoporosis. Multivariate regression analysis showed that menopausal status, BMI <23, and old age were independent variables significantly correlated with osteoporosis. CONCLUSION: PBC in itself has no negative influence on BMD. End-stage liver disease patients carry a disease-specific risk for osteoporosis, but have an effective risk of bone loss in relation to individual potential risk for each patient. A practical message should be taken into account, that is, every effort should be made to prevent osteoporosis when a patient has simple osteopenia, or if it is a woman in or near menopausal age.

Is osteoporosis a peculiar association with primary biliary cirrhosis?

FLOREANI, ANNAROSA;CAMOZZI, VALENTINA;BALDO, VINCENZO;PLEBANI M.;BURRA, PATRIZIA;
2005

Abstract

AIM: (1) To compare the prevalence of osteoporosis (t-score < or =-2.5 SD) between stage IV PBC patients, and two groups of age- and sex-matched controls: one with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis, and the other one consisting of a group of healthy subjects from the general population; (2) to identify the main risk factors for the development of bone loss. METHODS: Thirty-five stage IV PBC patients (mean age 52.5+/-10 years), 49 females with HCV-related cirrhosis (mean age 52.9+/-5.8 years) and 33 healthy females (mean age 51.8+/-2.22 years) were enrolled in the study. Bone metabolism was evaluated by measuring serum calcium corrected for serum albumin (Ca corr.), 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OH vit D), parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed at the lumbar spine by dual-photon X-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS: Osteoporosis was present in 5/35 PBC patients (14.2%) and in 7/49 HCV-related cirrhotic patients (14.3%), without any statistical difference between the two groups. Among healthy control subjects, none had osteoporosis. No difference was found between the three groups in serum parameters of bone metabolism. Univariate analysis showed that menopausal state and low BMI were significantly correlated with osteoporosis. Multivariate regression analysis showed that menopausal status, BMI <23, and old age were independent variables significantly correlated with osteoporosis. CONCLUSION: PBC in itself has no negative influence on BMD. End-stage liver disease patients carry a disease-specific risk for osteoporosis, but have an effective risk of bone loss in relation to individual potential risk for each patient. A practical message should be taken into account, that is, every effort should be made to prevent osteoporosis when a patient has simple osteopenia, or if it is a woman in or near menopausal age.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/2435288
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