The gracilis muscle is used widely in reconstructive surgery, as a pedicled or as a free microsurgical flap, for soft tissue coverage or as a functioning muscle transfer. Many studies, based on cadaver dissections, have focused on the vascular anatomy of the gracilis muscle and provided different data about the number, origin, and caliber of its vascular pedicles. Computed tomographic (CT) angiography of both thighs of 40 patients (35 males and 5 females, mean age: 63 years) have been analyzed to provide a detailed anatomical description of the arterial supply of the gracilis muscle. The gracilis muscle had a mean length of 41 +/- 2.1 cm. The principal pedicle enters the gracilis muscle at a mean distance (+/-SD) of 10 +/- 1 cm from the ischiopubic attachment of the muscle. Its caliber shows a mean value of 2.5 +/- 0.5 mm, and it is statistically larger when originating directly from the deep femoral artery (45%) than from its muscular branch supplying the adductors, i.e., the "artery to the adductors" (46%) (P < 0.01). A significant correlation between the caliber of the artery of the main pedicle and the volume of the gracilis muscle was found (P < 0.01). The mean number of distal accessory pedicles is 1.8 (range, 1-4,) and the artery of the first of these pedicles shows a mean caliber of 2.0 mm. There is no correlation between either the number or the caliber of the artery of the accessory pedicles and the volume of the gracilis muscle. CT angiography, providing detailed images of the muscular and vascular structures of the thigh of each patient, could be a useful preoperative study for the reconstructive surgeon. It would allow a personalized planning of a gracilis flap, reducing the risk of iatrogenic damage.

The gracilis muscle and its use in clinical reconstruction: an anatomical, embryological, and radiological study.

MACCHI, VERONICA;PORZIONATO, ANDREA;TIENGO, CESARE;STECCO, CARLA;PARENTI, ANNA ROSITA;BASSETTO, FRANCO;MAZZOLENI, FRANCESCO;DE CARO, RAFFAELE
2008

Abstract

The gracilis muscle is used widely in reconstructive surgery, as a pedicled or as a free microsurgical flap, for soft tissue coverage or as a functioning muscle transfer. Many studies, based on cadaver dissections, have focused on the vascular anatomy of the gracilis muscle and provided different data about the number, origin, and caliber of its vascular pedicles. Computed tomographic (CT) angiography of both thighs of 40 patients (35 males and 5 females, mean age: 63 years) have been analyzed to provide a detailed anatomical description of the arterial supply of the gracilis muscle. The gracilis muscle had a mean length of 41 +/- 2.1 cm. The principal pedicle enters the gracilis muscle at a mean distance (+/-SD) of 10 +/- 1 cm from the ischiopubic attachment of the muscle. Its caliber shows a mean value of 2.5 +/- 0.5 mm, and it is statistically larger when originating directly from the deep femoral artery (45%) than from its muscular branch supplying the adductors, i.e., the "artery to the adductors" (46%) (P < 0.01). A significant correlation between the caliber of the artery of the main pedicle and the volume of the gracilis muscle was found (P < 0.01). The mean number of distal accessory pedicles is 1.8 (range, 1-4,) and the artery of the first of these pedicles shows a mean caliber of 2.0 mm. There is no correlation between either the number or the caliber of the artery of the accessory pedicles and the volume of the gracilis muscle. CT angiography, providing detailed images of the muscular and vascular structures of the thigh of each patient, could be a useful preoperative study for the reconstructive surgeon. It would allow a personalized planning of a gracilis flap, reducing the risk of iatrogenic damage.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/2438407
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