The Simon effect has been previously shown to be asymmetric at both the behavioral and electrophysiological levels. The present investigation was aimed to clarify whether, during a Simon task, hemispheric asymmetry is also observed in the early phases of stimulus processing. In a group of healthy subjects performing the Simon task, we analyzed scalp potentials evoked by the first lateralized cue (left or right), instead of the classical readiness potential preceding the motor response. ERP results showed a significant left cortical activation to stimuli presented in the right visual field at the 140-160 ms time window. Instead, left stimuli elicited a significant activation of the right versus left hemisphere starting at the next 160-180 ms time interval. We linked this asymmetry to that observed in behavioral data: the Simon effect recorded with left stimuli is smaller than the Simon effect recorded with right stimuli. Results confirm the hypothesis that in right handed subjects, left hemisphere is specialized for motor response selection and is able to process right stimuli faster than the right hemisphere does for left stimuli.

Asymmetrical hemispheric EEG activation evoked by stimulus position during the Simon task

SPIRONELLI, CHIARA;TAGLIABUE, MARIAELENA;ANGRILLI, ALESSANDRO
2006

Abstract

The Simon effect has been previously shown to be asymmetric at both the behavioral and electrophysiological levels. The present investigation was aimed to clarify whether, during a Simon task, hemispheric asymmetry is also observed in the early phases of stimulus processing. In a group of healthy subjects performing the Simon task, we analyzed scalp potentials evoked by the first lateralized cue (left or right), instead of the classical readiness potential preceding the motor response. ERP results showed a significant left cortical activation to stimuli presented in the right visual field at the 140-160 ms time window. Instead, left stimuli elicited a significant activation of the right versus left hemisphere starting at the next 160-180 ms time interval. We linked this asymmetry to that observed in behavioral data: the Simon effect recorded with left stimuli is smaller than the Simon effect recorded with right stimuli. Results confirm the hypothesis that in right handed subjects, left hemisphere is specialized for motor response selection and is able to process right stimuli faster than the right hemisphere does for left stimuli.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2449141
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