Background. Although many randomized trials and other multicenter studies have demonstrated the benefits of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in selected symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, including women, there is a remarkable lack of reports regarding the outcome of CEA with respect to sex. To analyze and compare the outcome of CEA in men and women in a single-group experience, we reviewed a consecutive series of 619 CEAs performed in 539 patients, 371 men (423 CEAs) and 168 women (196 CEAs). Methods. Data collection was retrospective up to August 1, 1992 and prospective for all 405 patients treated thereafter. Results. Women were significantly less likely than men to have overt evidence of coronary artery disease (P < .001) and had a significantly higher incidence of diabetes (P < .001). No perioperative death occurred in the female group (P = NS), and no statistical difference was found in perioperative stroke risk incidence. Women had a significantly higher incidence of late occlusive events (P = .01), which were all asymptomatic. No late stroke occurred in the female group (P = NS). Life-table cumulative survival rates at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 99.3%, 90.5%, 85.9%, and 82.3%, respectively, in women, and 98.9%, 91.9%, 85.2%, and 79.6% in men (log-rank P = .8). Conclusions. These findings show that perioperative stroke risk and mortality rates, as well as late strokefree, mortality, and recurrence rates, in patients undergoing CEA, are comparable in men and women. Further, larger comparative studies are necessary to provide more information on the benefit and durability of CEA in asymptomatic patients, but the results of this study suggest that the early and late outcomes are excellent and comparable in symptomatic and asymptomatic men and women.

Carotid endarterectomy in women: Early and long-term results.

BALLOTTA, ENZO;SARZO, GIACOMO;SALADINI, MARINA;BARACCHINI, CLAUDIO;MENEGHETTI, GIORGIO
2000

Abstract

Background. Although many randomized trials and other multicenter studies have demonstrated the benefits of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in selected symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, including women, there is a remarkable lack of reports regarding the outcome of CEA with respect to sex. To analyze and compare the outcome of CEA in men and women in a single-group experience, we reviewed a consecutive series of 619 CEAs performed in 539 patients, 371 men (423 CEAs) and 168 women (196 CEAs). Methods. Data collection was retrospective up to August 1, 1992 and prospective for all 405 patients treated thereafter. Results. Women were significantly less likely than men to have overt evidence of coronary artery disease (P < .001) and had a significantly higher incidence of diabetes (P < .001). No perioperative death occurred in the female group (P = NS), and no statistical difference was found in perioperative stroke risk incidence. Women had a significantly higher incidence of late occlusive events (P = .01), which were all asymptomatic. No late stroke occurred in the female group (P = NS). Life-table cumulative survival rates at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 99.3%, 90.5%, 85.9%, and 82.3%, respectively, in women, and 98.9%, 91.9%, 85.2%, and 79.6% in men (log-rank P = .8). Conclusions. These findings show that perioperative stroke risk and mortality rates, as well as late strokefree, mortality, and recurrence rates, in patients undergoing CEA, are comparable in men and women. Further, larger comparative studies are necessary to provide more information on the benefit and durability of CEA in asymptomatic patients, but the results of this study suggest that the early and late outcomes are excellent and comparable in symptomatic and asymptomatic men and women.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2461297
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