OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a volatile anesthetic, isoflurane, on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and middle latency responses (MLRs) recorded in rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS: ABRs and MLRs evoked by click stimuli were simultaneously recorded in eight rats in the awake condition and during anesthesia with isoflurane at clinically relevant concentrations. RESULTS: Vertex-recorded ABRs showed a significant increase in the latency of waves I-IV during anesthesia and the latency changes appeared to be significantly related to the isoflurane concentration. The I-IV interval also appeared to be significantly increased in comparison to the awake condition, while minor changes in ABR amplitudes were induced by isoflurane. MLRs, which were recorded by means of epidural electrodes implanted over the auditory cortex, appeared to be attenuated in amplitude and increased in latency during anesthesia. Only latency changes appeared to be significantly related to the isoflurane concentration. Moreover, "bursts" of high amplitude MLRs were observed during anesthesia at each concentration. CONCLUSION: The present findings indicate that both ABR and MLR latencies are increased by isoflurane in a concentration-dependent manner, whilst the anesthetic-induced attenuation in amplitude does not appear to be related to the isoflurane concentration.

Effects of isoflurane on the the auditory brainstem responses and middle latency responses of rats.

SANTARELLI, ROSAMARIA;ARSLAN, EDOARDO;
2003

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a volatile anesthetic, isoflurane, on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and middle latency responses (MLRs) recorded in rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS: ABRs and MLRs evoked by click stimuli were simultaneously recorded in eight rats in the awake condition and during anesthesia with isoflurane at clinically relevant concentrations. RESULTS: Vertex-recorded ABRs showed a significant increase in the latency of waves I-IV during anesthesia and the latency changes appeared to be significantly related to the isoflurane concentration. The I-IV interval also appeared to be significantly increased in comparison to the awake condition, while minor changes in ABR amplitudes were induced by isoflurane. MLRs, which were recorded by means of epidural electrodes implanted over the auditory cortex, appeared to be attenuated in amplitude and increased in latency during anesthesia. Only latency changes appeared to be significantly related to the isoflurane concentration. Moreover, "bursts" of high amplitude MLRs were observed during anesthesia at each concentration. CONCLUSION: The present findings indicate that both ABR and MLR latencies are increased by isoflurane in a concentration-dependent manner, whilst the anesthetic-induced attenuation in amplitude does not appear to be related to the isoflurane concentration.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2461478
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