Coverage of large, full-thickness burns presents a challenge for the surgeon due to the lack of availability of the patient's own skin. Currently, tissue engineering offers the possibility of performing a suitable therapeutic wound coverage after early burn excision by using cultured keratinocyte sheets supported by a dermal layer. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a skin substitute composed of both epidermal and dermal elements. For this purpose we grew keratinocytes and fibroblasts separately for 15 days within two different types of biomaterials. Cells then were co-cultured for an additional period of 15 days, after which samples were taken and processed with either classic or immunohistochemical stainings. Results showed that (1) human fibroblasts and keratinocytes can be cultured on hyaluronic acid-derived biomaterials and that (2) the pattern of expression of particular dermal–epidermal molecules is similar to that found in normal skin. The data from this study suggest that our skin equivalent might be useful in the treatment of both burns and chronic wounds

In vitro engineering of human skin-like tissue.

CORTIVO, ROBERTA;BRUN, PAOLA;
1998

Abstract

Coverage of large, full-thickness burns presents a challenge for the surgeon due to the lack of availability of the patient's own skin. Currently, tissue engineering offers the possibility of performing a suitable therapeutic wound coverage after early burn excision by using cultured keratinocyte sheets supported by a dermal layer. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a skin substitute composed of both epidermal and dermal elements. For this purpose we grew keratinocytes and fibroblasts separately for 15 days within two different types of biomaterials. Cells then were co-cultured for an additional period of 15 days, after which samples were taken and processed with either classic or immunohistochemical stainings. Results showed that (1) human fibroblasts and keratinocytes can be cultured on hyaluronic acid-derived biomaterials and that (2) the pattern of expression of particular dermal–epidermal molecules is similar to that found in normal skin. The data from this study suggest that our skin equivalent might be useful in the treatment of both burns and chronic wounds
1998
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2462588
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