The most frequent type of injury that causes death or disability in motorcycle accidents is head injury. The only item of personal protective equipment that protects a motorcyclist's head in real-world accidents is the safety helmet. The protective capability of a helmet is assessed, according to international standards, through the impact of a headform fitted with the helmet onto an anvil. The purpose of the present work was to study the influence of the presence of the body on the impact response of the helmeted head. Full-body and detached-head impacts were simulated using the finite element (FE) method. As a consequence of the presence of the body, the crushing distance of the helmet liner was drastically increased. This evidence indicated that the effect of the body should be included in impact absorption tests in order to provide conditions that are more realistic and stringent. The solution to an analytical model of the helmeted headform impact revealed that increasing the headform mass has the same influence on impact outputs, particularly the liner's crushing distance, as including the whole body in impact tests. The added mass was calculated by using a helmeted Hybrid III dummy for an impact configuration that frequently occurred in real-world accidents.

Influence of the body on the response of the helmeted head during impact

GALVANETTO, UGO;
2011

Abstract

The most frequent type of injury that causes death or disability in motorcycle accidents is head injury. The only item of personal protective equipment that protects a motorcyclist's head in real-world accidents is the safety helmet. The protective capability of a helmet is assessed, according to international standards, through the impact of a headform fitted with the helmet onto an anvil. The purpose of the present work was to study the influence of the presence of the body on the impact response of the helmeted head. Full-body and detached-head impacts were simulated using the finite element (FE) method. As a consequence of the presence of the body, the crushing distance of the helmet liner was drastically increased. This evidence indicated that the effect of the body should be included in impact absorption tests in order to provide conditions that are more realistic and stringent. The solution to an analytical model of the helmeted headform impact revealed that increasing the headform mass has the same influence on impact outputs, particularly the liner's crushing distance, as including the whole body in impact tests. The added mass was calculated by using a helmeted Hybrid III dummy for an impact configuration that frequently occurred in real-world accidents.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/2481122
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