Current undergraduate medical curricula provides relatively little time for cadaver dissection. The Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology at the University of Padova has organized a pilot project with the University Hospital for the donation of body parts that are surgically removed for therapeutic purposes and destined under Italian law for destruction. The aim of the project is to improve residents' practical training skills. A survey over the last two years has shown that about 60 body parts were available each year. These included 13 upper limbs or their parts (i.e., forearm with hand, hand, and fingers) and 47 lower limbs or their parts (i.e., legs with feet, feet, or toes). The residents explained the aim of the project to potential donors, and, if patients were willing to donate, their informed consent was obtained. The residents were present in the operating theater during the surgical procedure. In the post-operative phase, the same residents performed dissections on the body part(s), following a teaching schedule prepared by a clinical anatomist, who also assisted residents during their studies. Residents also acted as tutors for undergraduate medical students who attended these dissections. The underlying pathology for which the body part was removed was examined, and surgical procedures were practiced on the body part itself. Our project provided an opportunity for a close relationship between anatomists and surgeons, reinforcing core knowledge of anatomy by appreciation of its clinical importance. The active involvement of residents as learners and as teachers in the various steps of this project improved their knowledge of surgical techniques and helped to establish a sense of ethical responsibility and respect for the human body. This approach involves study of anatomical structures from new perspectives and leads to improved surgical practice.

Body Parts Removed During Surgery: A Useful Training Source

MACCHI, VERONICA;PORZIONATO, ANDREA;STECCO, CARLA;TIENGO, CESARE;PARENTI, ANNA ROSITA;DE CARO, RAFFAELE
2011

Abstract

Current undergraduate medical curricula provides relatively little time for cadaver dissection. The Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology at the University of Padova has organized a pilot project with the University Hospital for the donation of body parts that are surgically removed for therapeutic purposes and destined under Italian law for destruction. The aim of the project is to improve residents' practical training skills. A survey over the last two years has shown that about 60 body parts were available each year. These included 13 upper limbs or their parts (i.e., forearm with hand, hand, and fingers) and 47 lower limbs or their parts (i.e., legs with feet, feet, or toes). The residents explained the aim of the project to potential donors, and, if patients were willing to donate, their informed consent was obtained. The residents were present in the operating theater during the surgical procedure. In the post-operative phase, the same residents performed dissections on the body part(s), following a teaching schedule prepared by a clinical anatomist, who also assisted residents during their studies. Residents also acted as tutors for undergraduate medical students who attended these dissections. The underlying pathology for which the body part was removed was examined, and surgical procedures were practiced on the body part itself. Our project provided an opportunity for a close relationship between anatomists and surgeons, reinforcing core knowledge of anatomy by appreciation of its clinical importance. The active involvement of residents as learners and as teachers in the various steps of this project improved their knowledge of surgical techniques and helped to establish a sense of ethical responsibility and respect for the human body. This approach involves study of anatomical structures from new perspectives and leads to improved surgical practice.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2481935
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