The impact of sex and age on glucose metabolism in the development of overweight/obesity is a matter of debate. We hypothesized that insulin sensitivity (IS) and beta-cell function (BF) in a normal white population will differ between males and females and aimed to evaluate the possible effects of BMI and age on metabolic parameters of both sexes. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of the general community. IS was measured with quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and oral glucose insulin sensitivity (OGIS) and BF with the insulinogenic index during 75-g 2-h oral glucose-tolerance tests (OGTTs). We studied 611 females and 361 males with normal glycemia according to both fasting and 2-h glucose (85 ± 0.3 mg/dl (means ± SE) in females and 89 ± 0.4 in males (P < 0.0001), and 93 ± 1 in females and 89 ± 1 in males (P = 0.005), respectively). Females were younger (37 ± 1 years) than males (40 ± 1, P < 0.0001), but no difference was found in mean BMI (BMI = 25.8 ± 0.2 kg/m2 in both). Student’s two-sample t-test was used for simple comparison between and within genders, multiple linear regressions to account for covariates. During the OGTT, females had lower glucose (area under the curve (AUC) 133 ± 1 mg/ml 2 h vs. 148 ± 2; P < 0.00001), while insulinemia was comparable (AUC 5.3 ± 0.1 mU/ml 2 h vs. 5.7 ± 0.2, P = 0.15). IS remained higher in females (473 ± 3 ml/min/m2 vs. 454 ± 3, P < 0.0001) also after having accounted for age and BMI (P = 0.015). No difference was observed in fasting insulin or BF. However, BF increased by 46% with BMI and when accounting for age and BMI, BF of females was significantly higher (P < 0.0001). Because IS and BF are higher in females than in males, sex should be considered in metabolic studies and overweight/obese populations.

Influence of Increasing BMI on Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion in Normotolerant Men and Women of a Wide Age Span

BRAZZALE, ALESSANDRA ROSALBA;
2012

Abstract

The impact of sex and age on glucose metabolism in the development of overweight/obesity is a matter of debate. We hypothesized that insulin sensitivity (IS) and beta-cell function (BF) in a normal white population will differ between males and females and aimed to evaluate the possible effects of BMI and age on metabolic parameters of both sexes. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of the general community. IS was measured with quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and oral glucose insulin sensitivity (OGIS) and BF with the insulinogenic index during 75-g 2-h oral glucose-tolerance tests (OGTTs). We studied 611 females and 361 males with normal glycemia according to both fasting and 2-h glucose (85 ± 0.3 mg/dl (means ± SE) in females and 89 ± 0.4 in males (P < 0.0001), and 93 ± 1 in females and 89 ± 1 in males (P = 0.005), respectively). Females were younger (37 ± 1 years) than males (40 ± 1, P < 0.0001), but no difference was found in mean BMI (BMI = 25.8 ± 0.2 kg/m2 in both). Student’s two-sample t-test was used for simple comparison between and within genders, multiple linear regressions to account for covariates. During the OGTT, females had lower glucose (area under the curve (AUC) 133 ± 1 mg/ml 2 h vs. 148 ± 2; P < 0.00001), while insulinemia was comparable (AUC 5.3 ± 0.1 mU/ml 2 h vs. 5.7 ± 0.2, P = 0.15). IS remained higher in females (473 ± 3 ml/min/m2 vs. 454 ± 3, P < 0.0001) also after having accounted for age and BMI (P = 0.015). No difference was observed in fasting insulin or BF. However, BF increased by 46% with BMI and when accounting for age and BMI, BF of females was significantly higher (P < 0.0001). Because IS and BF are higher in females than in males, sex should be considered in metabolic studies and overweight/obese populations.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2482731
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 22
  • Scopus 40
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 40
social impact