Introduction. Recent evidence suggests that sexually antagonistic genetic factors in the maternal line promote homosexuality in men and fecundity in female relatives. However, it is not clear if and how these genetic factors are phenotypically expressed to simultaneously induce homosexuality in men and increased fecundity in their mothers and maternal aunts. Aims. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenotypic expression of genetic factors that could explain increased fecundity in the putative females carriers. Methods. Using a questionnaire-based approach, which included also the BFQ personality inventory based on the Big Five theory, we investigated fecundity in 161 female European subjects and scrutinized possible influences, including physiological, behavioral, and personality factors. We compared 61 female probands who were either mothers or maternal aunts of homosexual men. One hundred females who were mothers or aunts of heterosexual men were used as controls. Main Outcome Measures. Personality traits, retrospective physiological and clinical data, behavior and opinions on fecundity related issues were assessed and analyzed to illustrate possible effects on fecundity between probands and control females. Results. Our analysis showed that both mothers and maternal aunts of homosexual men show increased fecundity compared with corresponding maternal female relatives of heterosexual men. A two-step statistical analysis, which was based on t-tests and multiple logistic regression analysis, showed that mothers and maternal aunts of homosexual men 1) had fewer gynecological disorders, 2) had fewer complicated pregnancies, 3) had less interest in having children, 4) placed less emphasis on romantic love within couples, 5) placed less importance on their social life, 6) showed reduced family stability, 7) were more extraverted, and 8) had divorced or separated from their spouses more frequently.

Factors Associated with Higher Fecundity in Female Maternal Relatives of Homosexual Men

CAMPERIO CIANI, ANDREA-SIGFRIDO;FONTANESI, LILYBETH;
2012

Abstract

Introduction. Recent evidence suggests that sexually antagonistic genetic factors in the maternal line promote homosexuality in men and fecundity in female relatives. However, it is not clear if and how these genetic factors are phenotypically expressed to simultaneously induce homosexuality in men and increased fecundity in their mothers and maternal aunts. Aims. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenotypic expression of genetic factors that could explain increased fecundity in the putative females carriers. Methods. Using a questionnaire-based approach, which included also the BFQ personality inventory based on the Big Five theory, we investigated fecundity in 161 female European subjects and scrutinized possible influences, including physiological, behavioral, and personality factors. We compared 61 female probands who were either mothers or maternal aunts of homosexual men. One hundred females who were mothers or aunts of heterosexual men were used as controls. Main Outcome Measures. Personality traits, retrospective physiological and clinical data, behavior and opinions on fecundity related issues were assessed and analyzed to illustrate possible effects on fecundity between probands and control females. Results. Our analysis showed that both mothers and maternal aunts of homosexual men show increased fecundity compared with corresponding maternal female relatives of heterosexual men. A two-step statistical analysis, which was based on t-tests and multiple logistic regression analysis, showed that mothers and maternal aunts of homosexual men 1) had fewer gynecological disorders, 2) had fewer complicated pregnancies, 3) had less interest in having children, 4) placed less emphasis on romantic love within couples, 5) placed less importance on their social life, 6) showed reduced family stability, 7) were more extraverted, and 8) had divorced or separated from their spouses more frequently.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2494150
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