Cr(III) and Cr(VI) compounds of varying solubilities have been tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit cell growth and nucleic acid and protein syntheses in BHK cells, to induce alterations in the mitotic cycle in HEp cells, and to increase the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in CHO cells. All Cr(VI) compounds, and particularly those containing soluble Cr(VI), such as potassium dichromate and zinc yellow, differentially inhibit macromolecular syntheses in BKH cells, that of DNA being always the most affected. Among Cr(III) compounds, which generally have very low cytotoxicity, chromite is particularly active, and inhibits cell growth and DNA synthesis even more than the poorly soluble Cr(VI) compounds. Preincubation in growth medium, with or without metabolizing cell cultures, solubilizes considerable amounts of Cr(VI) from zinc yellow and chromite, but significant amounts are also obtained from the most insoluble Cr(VI) pigments. When BHK cells are treated with such preincubated solutions, reduction of soluble Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by cell metabolites is seen with all Cr(VI) compounds, accompanied by decreased cytotoxicity. The same differences between Cr(VI) and Cr(III) compounds apply to the cytotoxic effects on mitosis of HEp cells and the clastogenic effects on CHO cells. The activity of chromite, the only Cr(III) pigment capable of significantly increasing the frequency of SCE, is due to contamination with soluble Cr(VI). In contrast to the very low cytotoxicity of Cr(III), much higher chromium levels are detected in the cells incubated with soluble Cr(III) than with the same concentrations of soluble Cr(VI). 50% and 75% of chromium accumulated in the cells during treatments with Cr(VI) and Cr(III) respectively remains firmly bound to the cells, even when they are incubated for up to 48 h in normal growth medium. Chromium accumulated in the cells after treatment with Cr(III) is most probably bound to the cell membrane, whereas some of the Cr(VI) is transported through the cell membrane and reduced in the cell nucleus. The results of the present investigation are in agreement with those obtained with the same Cr(VI) and Cr(III) compounds in mutagenicity assays in bacteria and carcinogenicity tests in rodents. A re-evaluation of the mechanisms of chromium carcinogenisis is proposed.

Cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of soluble and insoluble compounds containing hexavalent and trivalent chromium.

LEVIS, ANGELO GINO;MAJONE, FRANCA
1981

Abstract

Cr(III) and Cr(VI) compounds of varying solubilities have been tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit cell growth and nucleic acid and protein syntheses in BHK cells, to induce alterations in the mitotic cycle in HEp cells, and to increase the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in CHO cells. All Cr(VI) compounds, and particularly those containing soluble Cr(VI), such as potassium dichromate and zinc yellow, differentially inhibit macromolecular syntheses in BKH cells, that of DNA being always the most affected. Among Cr(III) compounds, which generally have very low cytotoxicity, chromite is particularly active, and inhibits cell growth and DNA synthesis even more than the poorly soluble Cr(VI) compounds. Preincubation in growth medium, with or without metabolizing cell cultures, solubilizes considerable amounts of Cr(VI) from zinc yellow and chromite, but significant amounts are also obtained from the most insoluble Cr(VI) pigments. When BHK cells are treated with such preincubated solutions, reduction of soluble Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by cell metabolites is seen with all Cr(VI) compounds, accompanied by decreased cytotoxicity. The same differences between Cr(VI) and Cr(III) compounds apply to the cytotoxic effects on mitosis of HEp cells and the clastogenic effects on CHO cells. The activity of chromite, the only Cr(III) pigment capable of significantly increasing the frequency of SCE, is due to contamination with soluble Cr(VI). In contrast to the very low cytotoxicity of Cr(III), much higher chromium levels are detected in the cells incubated with soluble Cr(III) than with the same concentrations of soluble Cr(VI). 50% and 75% of chromium accumulated in the cells during treatments with Cr(VI) and Cr(III) respectively remains firmly bound to the cells, even when they are incubated for up to 48 h in normal growth medium. Chromium accumulated in the cells after treatment with Cr(III) is most probably bound to the cell membrane, whereas some of the Cr(VI) is transported through the cell membrane and reduced in the cell nucleus. The results of the present investigation are in agreement with those obtained with the same Cr(VI) and Cr(III) compounds in mutagenicity assays in bacteria and carcinogenicity tests in rodents. A re-evaluation of the mechanisms of chromium carcinogenisis is proposed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2509633
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