Plants are particularly prone to photo-oxidative damage caused by excess light. Photoprotection is essential for photosynthesis to proceed in oxygenic environments, either by scavenging harmful reactive intermediates or preventing their accumulation, in order to avoid photoinhibition. Carotenoids play a key role in protecting photosynthesis from the toxic effect of over-excitation: under excess light conditions, plants accumulate a specific carotenoid, zeaxanthin, which was shown to increase photoprotection. In this work, we genetically dissected different components of zeaxanthin-dependent photoprotection. By using time-resolved differential spectroscopy in vivo, we identified a zeaxanthin-dependent optical signal characterized by a red-shift in the carotenoid peak of the triplet-minus-singlet spectrum of leaves and pigment-binding proteins. By fractionating thylakoids into their component pigment-binding complexes, the signal was found to originate from the monomeric Lhcb4-6 antenna components of Photosystem II and the Lhca1-4 subunits of Photosystem I. By analyzing mutants based on their sensitivity to excess light, the red-shifted triplet-minus-singlet signal was tightly correlated with photoprotection in the chloroplasts, suggesting the signal implies an increased efficiency of zeaxanthin in controlling chlorophyll triplet formation. Fluorescence-detected magnetic resonance analysis showed a decrease in the amplitude of signals assigned to chlorophyll triplets belonging to the monomeric antenna complexes of Photosystem II upon zeaxanthin binding; however, the amplitude of carotenoid triplet signal does not increase correspondingly. Results show that the high light-induced binding of zeaxanthin to specific proteins, plays a major role in enhancing photoprotection by modulating the yield of potentially dangerous chlorophyll excited states in vivo, and preventing the production of singlet oxygen

Zeaxanthin protects plant photosynthesis by modulating chlorophyll triplet yield in specific light-harvesting antenna subunits

CARBONERA, DONATELLA;
2012

Abstract

Plants are particularly prone to photo-oxidative damage caused by excess light. Photoprotection is essential for photosynthesis to proceed in oxygenic environments, either by scavenging harmful reactive intermediates or preventing their accumulation, in order to avoid photoinhibition. Carotenoids play a key role in protecting photosynthesis from the toxic effect of over-excitation: under excess light conditions, plants accumulate a specific carotenoid, zeaxanthin, which was shown to increase photoprotection. In this work, we genetically dissected different components of zeaxanthin-dependent photoprotection. By using time-resolved differential spectroscopy in vivo, we identified a zeaxanthin-dependent optical signal characterized by a red-shift in the carotenoid peak of the triplet-minus-singlet spectrum of leaves and pigment-binding proteins. By fractionating thylakoids into their component pigment-binding complexes, the signal was found to originate from the monomeric Lhcb4-6 antenna components of Photosystem II and the Lhca1-4 subunits of Photosystem I. By analyzing mutants based on their sensitivity to excess light, the red-shifted triplet-minus-singlet signal was tightly correlated with photoprotection in the chloroplasts, suggesting the signal implies an increased efficiency of zeaxanthin in controlling chlorophyll triplet formation. Fluorescence-detected magnetic resonance analysis showed a decrease in the amplitude of signals assigned to chlorophyll triplets belonging to the monomeric antenna complexes of Photosystem II upon zeaxanthin binding; however, the amplitude of carotenoid triplet signal does not increase correspondingly. Results show that the high light-induced binding of zeaxanthin to specific proteins, plays a major role in enhancing photoprotection by modulating the yield of potentially dangerous chlorophyll excited states in vivo, and preventing the production of singlet oxygen
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2529771
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