Biological residual materials can be obtained from surgical activities or from pathological waste material collected for analysis and stored in formalin. This material can be stored in biobanks with the purpose of future research. Formalin-fixed tissue and also formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues are not suitable for all kinds of genetic studies on DNA or RNA, as formalin solution is well known for damaging nucleic acids. Therefore, for the purpose of conducting genetic studies, samples should be frozen in order to maintain a good quality of DNA/RNA over time. Biobanks, in which waste samples are frozen, are undoubtedly expensive to maintain; however, it could be useful and important to consider their possible implication in particular research, regarding for example the tumor cells growth process, or when the procurement of samples is difficult. Regarding the relationship between informed consent and tissue collection, storage and research, two choices are possible: irreversible or reversible sample anonymization. These procedures involve different approaches and possible solutions that we will seek to define. Also, an important ethical aspect in regard to the role of biobanks is encouraging sample donation. For donors, seeing human sample being kept rather than discarded and seeing them become useful for research highlight the importance of the human body and improve the attitude towards donation. This process might also facilitate the giving of informed consent more trustfully and willingly.

Use of Residual Material in Biobanking: Solidarity, Common Good, and Informed Consent

CAENAZZO, LUCIANA;TOZZO, PAMELA;
2012

Abstract

Biological residual materials can be obtained from surgical activities or from pathological waste material collected for analysis and stored in formalin. This material can be stored in biobanks with the purpose of future research. Formalin-fixed tissue and also formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues are not suitable for all kinds of genetic studies on DNA or RNA, as formalin solution is well known for damaging nucleic acids. Therefore, for the purpose of conducting genetic studies, samples should be frozen in order to maintain a good quality of DNA/RNA over time. Biobanks, in which waste samples are frozen, are undoubtedly expensive to maintain; however, it could be useful and important to consider their possible implication in particular research, regarding for example the tumor cells growth process, or when the procurement of samples is difficult. Regarding the relationship between informed consent and tissue collection, storage and research, two choices are possible: irreversible or reversible sample anonymization. These procedures involve different approaches and possible solutions that we will seek to define. Also, an important ethical aspect in regard to the role of biobanks is encouraging sample donation. For donors, seeing human sample being kept rather than discarded and seeing them become useful for research highlight the importance of the human body and improve the attitude towards donation. This process might also facilitate the giving of informed consent more trustfully and willingly.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2531644
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