The interest in research on exercise and physical activity effects on dual-task performance has grown rapidly in the last decade due to the aging global population. Most of the available literature is focused on exercise benefits for the risk of falls, attention, and gait-speed; however, there is a lack of evidence reporting the exercise effects on balance in healthy older adults during dual-task performance. The objective of this study was to critically review the existing evidence of a potential relationship between exercise and improvement of static and dynamic balance during dual-task in healthy older adults and secondary outcomes in other physical and cognitive indices. A systematic search using online databases was used to source articles. Inclusion criteria included articles classified as randomized controlled trials (RCT), controlled trials (CT) and uncontrolled trials (UT). Moreover, the studies had to include an exercise or physical activity protocol in the intervention. Eight studies met the eligibility criteria and included 6 RCTs, 1 CT, and 1 UT. Several limitations were identified, mainly focused on the lack of a common and standardized method to evaluate the balance during the dual-task performance. Additionally, exercise protocols were extensively different, and generally lacked reporting measures. Preliminary findings show that the current body of evidence does not support that exercises used in these interventions entail clear and noteworthy benefits on static or dynamic balance improvements during dual-task performance. Innovative measures and exercise programs may need to be developed before efficacious screening and treatment strategies can be used in clinical settings.

Effects of exercise on dual-task ability and balance in older adults: a systematic review.

GOBBO, STEFANO;BERGAMIN, MARCO;ERMOLAO, ANDREA;ZACCARIA, MARCO
2014

Abstract

The interest in research on exercise and physical activity effects on dual-task performance has grown rapidly in the last decade due to the aging global population. Most of the available literature is focused on exercise benefits for the risk of falls, attention, and gait-speed; however, there is a lack of evidence reporting the exercise effects on balance in healthy older adults during dual-task performance. The objective of this study was to critically review the existing evidence of a potential relationship between exercise and improvement of static and dynamic balance during dual-task in healthy older adults and secondary outcomes in other physical and cognitive indices. A systematic search using online databases was used to source articles. Inclusion criteria included articles classified as randomized controlled trials (RCT), controlled trials (CT) and uncontrolled trials (UT). Moreover, the studies had to include an exercise or physical activity protocol in the intervention. Eight studies met the eligibility criteria and included 6 RCTs, 1 CT, and 1 UT. Several limitations were identified, mainly focused on the lack of a common and standardized method to evaluate the balance during the dual-task performance. Additionally, exercise protocols were extensively different, and generally lacked reporting measures. Preliminary findings show that the current body of evidence does not support that exercises used in these interventions entail clear and noteworthy benefits on static or dynamic balance improvements during dual-task performance. Innovative measures and exercise programs may need to be developed before efficacious screening and treatment strategies can be used in clinical settings.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/2838004
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 21
  • Scopus 51
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 48
social impact