Post-translational modification is the most common mechanism of regulating protein function. If phosphorylation is considered a key event in many signal transduction pathways, other modifications must be considered as well. In particular the side chain of lysine residues is a target of different modifications; notably acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, sumoylation, neddylation, etc. Mass spectrometry approaches combining highly sensitive instruments and specific enrichment strategies have enabled the identification of modified sites on a large scale. Here we make a comparative analysis of the most representative lysine modifications (ubiquitylation, acetylation, sumoylation and methylation) identified in the human proteome. This review focuses on conserved amino acids, secondary structures preference, subcellular localization of modified proteins, and signaling pathways where these modifications are implicated. We discuss specific differences and similarities between these modifications, characteristics of the crosstalk among lysine post translational modifications, and single nucleotide polymorphisms that could influence lysine post-translational modifications in humans.

A Comparative Analysis and Review of lysyl Residues Affected by Post-translational Modifications

CESARO, LUCA;PINNA, LORENZO;SALVI, MAURO
2015

Abstract

Post-translational modification is the most common mechanism of regulating protein function. If phosphorylation is considered a key event in many signal transduction pathways, other modifications must be considered as well. In particular the side chain of lysine residues is a target of different modifications; notably acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, sumoylation, neddylation, etc. Mass spectrometry approaches combining highly sensitive instruments and specific enrichment strategies have enabled the identification of modified sites on a large scale. Here we make a comparative analysis of the most representative lysine modifications (ubiquitylation, acetylation, sumoylation and methylation) identified in the human proteome. This review focuses on conserved amino acids, secondary structures preference, subcellular localization of modified proteins, and signaling pathways where these modifications are implicated. We discuss specific differences and similarities between these modifications, characteristics of the crosstalk among lysine post translational modifications, and single nucleotide polymorphisms that could influence lysine post-translational modifications in humans.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3156378
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