BACKGROUND: This population-level health service study aimed to address whether hospitals assure the same quality of care to people in equal need, i.e. to see if any associations exist between social determinants and adherence to four hospital process indicators clearly identified as being linked to better health outcomes for patients. PARTICIPANTS: This was a retrospective cohort study based on administrative data collected in the Veneto Region (northeast Italy). We included residents of the Veneto Region hospitalized for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or acute myocardial infarction (AMI), hip fracture, or cholecystitis, and women giving birth, who were discharged from any hospital operating under the Veneto Regional Health Service between January 2012 and December 2012. METHOD: The following quality indicator rates were calculated: patients with STEMI-AMI treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, elderly patients with hip fractures who underwent surgery within 48 h of admission, laparoscopic cholecystectomies and women who underwent cesarean section. A multilevel, multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to test the association between age, gender, formal education or citizenship and the quality of hospital care processes. RESULTS: All the inpatient hospital care process quality indicators measured were associated with an undesirable number of disparities concerning the social determinants. CONCLUSION: Monitoring the evidence-based hospital health care process indicators reveals undesirable disparities. Administrative data sets are of considerable practical value in broad-based quality assessments and as a screening tool, also in the health disparities domain.

Are hospital process quality indicators influenced by socio-demographic health determinants?

BUJA, ALESSANDRA;Furlan P;SAIA, MARIO;BALDO, VINCENZO
2015

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This population-level health service study aimed to address whether hospitals assure the same quality of care to people in equal need, i.e. to see if any associations exist between social determinants and adherence to four hospital process indicators clearly identified as being linked to better health outcomes for patients. PARTICIPANTS: This was a retrospective cohort study based on administrative data collected in the Veneto Region (northeast Italy). We included residents of the Veneto Region hospitalized for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or acute myocardial infarction (AMI), hip fracture, or cholecystitis, and women giving birth, who were discharged from any hospital operating under the Veneto Regional Health Service between January 2012 and December 2012. METHOD: The following quality indicator rates were calculated: patients with STEMI-AMI treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, elderly patients with hip fractures who underwent surgery within 48 h of admission, laparoscopic cholecystectomies and women who underwent cesarean section. A multilevel, multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to test the association between age, gender, formal education or citizenship and the quality of hospital care processes. RESULTS: All the inpatient hospital care process quality indicators measured were associated with an undesirable number of disparities concerning the social determinants. CONCLUSION: Monitoring the evidence-based hospital health care process indicators reveals undesirable disparities. Administrative data sets are of considerable practical value in broad-based quality assessments and as a screening tool, also in the health disparities domain.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3157015
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