The presence of major depressive symptoms is usually considered a negative long-term prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI); however, most of the supporting research was conducted before the era of immediate reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention. The aims of this study are to evaluate if depression still retains long-term prognostic significance in our era of immediate coronary reperfusion, and to study possible correlations with clinical parameters of physical performance. In 184 patients with recent ST-elevated AMI (STEMI), treated by immediate reperfusion, moderate or severe depressive symptoms (evaluated by Beck Depression Inventory version I) were present in 10 % of cases. Physical performance was evaluated by two 6-min walk tests and by a symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test: somatic/affective (but not cognitive/affective) symptoms of depression and perceived quality of life (evaluated by the EuroQoL questionnaire) are worse in patients with lower levels of physical performance. Follow-up was performed after a median of 29 months by means of telephone interviews; 32 major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) occurred. The presence of three vessels disease and low left ventricle ejection fraction are correlated with a greater incidence of MACE; only somatic/affective (but not cognitive/affective) symptoms of depression correlate with long-term outcomes. In patients with recent STEMI treated by immediate reperfusion, somatic/affective but not cognitive/affective symptoms of depression show prognostic value on long-term MACE. Depression symptoms are not predictors "per se" of adverse prognosis, but seem to express an underlying worse cardiac efficiency, clinically reflected by poorer physical performance.

Depressive symptoms, functional measures and long-term outcomes of high-risk ST-elevated myocardial infarction patients treated by primary angioplasty

RUSSO, NICOLA;COMPOSTELLA, CATERINA;VETTORE, ELIA;TARANTINI, GIUSEPPE;ILICETO, SABINO;BELLOTTO, FABIO
2016

Abstract

The presence of major depressive symptoms is usually considered a negative long-term prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI); however, most of the supporting research was conducted before the era of immediate reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention. The aims of this study are to evaluate if depression still retains long-term prognostic significance in our era of immediate coronary reperfusion, and to study possible correlations with clinical parameters of physical performance. In 184 patients with recent ST-elevated AMI (STEMI), treated by immediate reperfusion, moderate or severe depressive symptoms (evaluated by Beck Depression Inventory version I) were present in 10 % of cases. Physical performance was evaluated by two 6-min walk tests and by a symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test: somatic/affective (but not cognitive/affective) symptoms of depression and perceived quality of life (evaluated by the EuroQoL questionnaire) are worse in patients with lower levels of physical performance. Follow-up was performed after a median of 29 months by means of telephone interviews; 32 major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) occurred. The presence of three vessels disease and low left ventricle ejection fraction are correlated with a greater incidence of MACE; only somatic/affective (but not cognitive/affective) symptoms of depression correlate with long-term outcomes. In patients with recent STEMI treated by immediate reperfusion, somatic/affective but not cognitive/affective symptoms of depression show prognostic value on long-term MACE. Depression symptoms are not predictors "per se" of adverse prognosis, but seem to express an underlying worse cardiac efficiency, clinically reflected by poorer physical performance.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3207050
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