Aim: The purpose of the present study was to study changes of balance control after a short-term multidimensional treatment in a sample of chronic alcoholics. Alcohol ingestion negatively impacts physical performance, causing worsening of psychomotor skills and reduced postural control [1], exercise is associated with positive outcomes in the treatment of alcohol dependence [2]. Method: Participants were 30 alcoholic patients (20 men, 10 women; mean age = 46.9 ±6.6 years; mean BMI = 25.7 ±4.4) consecutively admitted to a 4-week residential treatment. They completed the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). Pre- post-measures of standing balance were collected with open and closed eyes on a firm surface and on a foam, by using a low cost set up based on Nintendo Wii Balance Board and a custom-made software [3,4]. Dynamic balance was tested by means of the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) test. Twelve patients attended a specific balance exercises program (group 1, mean session = 10.8 ±0.8), 10 participated in standardized group-based physical activities (group 2, mean sessions attended = 11.2 ±1.3), 8 served as control and did not take part to organized physical activities during their hospitalization (group 3). Results: No significant difference by group were observed at the baseline on all the variables. Significant correlations (p < .01) of FES-I with DHI and DGI and between DHI and DGI were found. Significant correlation between all the sway-path measures (mm/s) with open/closed eyes and with/without foam were recorded. The mean value of the FES-I at baseline was 10.2 ±4.5. Patients in group 1 reported significant improvements in the DHI (p = .019) and in the DGI (p = .021). Patients in group 2 and in group 3 did not reported significant changes in both self-reported measures and in static and dynamic balance test. Conclusion: Findings support the notion that balance control represents a serious problem for chronic alcoholics and that most patients are not aware of their problematic. A specific exercise program oriented to improve balance control seems to be an effective strategy to ameliorate in the short time the selfperceived handicapping effects imposed by balance-related problems and the dynamic balance. References [1] Wober C. et al. (1999) Postural control and lifetime alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent patients. Acta Neurol. Scand., 99, 48-53. [2] Carraro A. (2013) The role of exercise in alcohol dependence recovery. In M. Probst & A. Carraro (Eds.), Mental health and physical activity: a practice oriented approach, 61-69. Milano: Edi Ermes. [3] Carraro A. et al. (2013) Non-conventional methods for assessing standing balance: reliability evaluation of the Nintendo Wii balance board. European College of Sport Science book of abstract, 593-594.

Changes of balance control in alcoholic patients after a short-term treatment: preliminary results of a trial

CARRARO, ATTILIO;GOBBI, ERICA;PAVAN, PIERO
2013

Abstract

Aim: The purpose of the present study was to study changes of balance control after a short-term multidimensional treatment in a sample of chronic alcoholics. Alcohol ingestion negatively impacts physical performance, causing worsening of psychomotor skills and reduced postural control [1], exercise is associated with positive outcomes in the treatment of alcohol dependence [2]. Method: Participants were 30 alcoholic patients (20 men, 10 women; mean age = 46.9 ±6.6 years; mean BMI = 25.7 ±4.4) consecutively admitted to a 4-week residential treatment. They completed the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). Pre- post-measures of standing balance were collected with open and closed eyes on a firm surface and on a foam, by using a low cost set up based on Nintendo Wii Balance Board and a custom-made software [3,4]. Dynamic balance was tested by means of the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) test. Twelve patients attended a specific balance exercises program (group 1, mean session = 10.8 ±0.8), 10 participated in standardized group-based physical activities (group 2, mean sessions attended = 11.2 ±1.3), 8 served as control and did not take part to organized physical activities during their hospitalization (group 3). Results: No significant difference by group were observed at the baseline on all the variables. Significant correlations (p < .01) of FES-I with DHI and DGI and between DHI and DGI were found. Significant correlation between all the sway-path measures (mm/s) with open/closed eyes and with/without foam were recorded. The mean value of the FES-I at baseline was 10.2 ±4.5. Patients in group 1 reported significant improvements in the DHI (p = .019) and in the DGI (p = .021). Patients in group 2 and in group 3 did not reported significant changes in both self-reported measures and in static and dynamic balance test. Conclusion: Findings support the notion that balance control represents a serious problem for chronic alcoholics and that most patients are not aware of their problematic. A specific exercise program oriented to improve balance control seems to be an effective strategy to ameliorate in the short time the selfperceived handicapping effects imposed by balance-related problems and the dynamic balance. References [1] Wober C. et al. (1999) Postural control and lifetime alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent patients. Acta Neurol. Scand., 99, 48-53. [2] Carraro A. (2013) The role of exercise in alcohol dependence recovery. In M. Probst & A. Carraro (Eds.), Mental health and physical activity: a practice oriented approach, 61-69. Milano: Edi Ermes. [3] Carraro A. et al. (2013) Non-conventional methods for assessing standing balance: reliability evaluation of the Nintendo Wii balance board. European College of Sport Science book of abstract, 593-594.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3210484
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