Passive and imagined limb movements induce changes in cerebral oscillatory activity. Central modulatory effects play a role in plastic changes, and are of uttermost importance in rehabilitation. This has extensively been studied for upper limb, but less is known for lower limb. The aim of this study is to investigate the topographical distribution of event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) and task-related coherence during a robot-assisted and a motor imagery task of lower limb in healthy subjects to inform rehabilitation paradigms. 32-channels electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded in twenty-one healthy right footed and handed subjects during a robot-assisted single-joint cyclic right ankle movement performed by the BTS ANYMOV robotic hospital bed. Data were acquired with a block protocol for passive and imagined movement at a frequency of 0.2 Hz. ERD/ERS and task related coherence were calculated in alpha1 (810 Hz), alpha2 (10.512.5 Hz) and beta (1330 Hz) frequency ranges. During passive movement, alpha2 rhythm desynchronized over C3 and ipsilateral frontal areas (F4, FC2, FC6); beta ERD was detected over the bilateral motor areas (Cz, C3, C4). During motor imagery, a significant desynchronization was evident for alpha1 over contralateral sensorimotor cortex (C3), for alpha2 over bilateral motor areas (C3 and C4), and for beta over central scalp areas. Task-related coherence decreased during passive movement in alpha2 band between contralateral central area (C3, CP5, CP1, P3) and ipsilateral frontal area (F8, FC6, T8); beta band coherence decreased between C3-C4 electrodes, and increased between C3-Cz. These data contribute to the understanding of oscillatory activity and functional neuronal interactions during lower limb robot-assisted motor performance. The final output of this line of research is to inform the design and development of neurorehabilitation protocols.

Quantitative EEG evaluation during robot-assisted foot movement

Formaggio, Emanuela;MASIERO, STEFANO;BOSCO, ANNA;PICCIONE, FRANCESCO;DEL FELICE, ALESSANDRA
2017

Abstract

Passive and imagined limb movements induce changes in cerebral oscillatory activity. Central modulatory effects play a role in plastic changes, and are of uttermost importance in rehabilitation. This has extensively been studied for upper limb, but less is known for lower limb. The aim of this study is to investigate the topographical distribution of event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) and task-related coherence during a robot-assisted and a motor imagery task of lower limb in healthy subjects to inform rehabilitation paradigms. 32-channels electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded in twenty-one healthy right footed and handed subjects during a robot-assisted single-joint cyclic right ankle movement performed by the BTS ANYMOV robotic hospital bed. Data were acquired with a block protocol for passive and imagined movement at a frequency of 0.2 Hz. ERD/ERS and task related coherence were calculated in alpha1 (810 Hz), alpha2 (10.512.5 Hz) and beta (1330 Hz) frequency ranges. During passive movement, alpha2 rhythm desynchronized over C3 and ipsilateral frontal areas (F4, FC2, FC6); beta ERD was detected over the bilateral motor areas (Cz, C3, C4). During motor imagery, a significant desynchronization was evident for alpha1 over contralateral sensorimotor cortex (C3), for alpha2 over bilateral motor areas (C3 and C4), and for beta over central scalp areas. Task-related coherence decreased during passive movement in alpha2 band between contralateral central area (C3, CP5, CP1, P3) and ipsilateral frontal area (F8, FC6, T8); beta band coherence decreased between C3-C4 electrodes, and increased between C3-Cz. These data contribute to the understanding of oscillatory activity and functional neuronal interactions during lower limb robot-assisted motor performance. The final output of this line of research is to inform the design and development of neurorehabilitation protocols.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3211007
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 9
  • Scopus 28
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 27
social impact