Increasing evidence suggests that a dysfunctional dopaminergic system affects the ability to socially interact. Since Parkinson's disease (PD) provides a model for assessing dopaminergic dysfunctions in humans, our study was designed to investigate social interactions in PD patients receiving dopamine replacement therapy (Levodopa=L-Dopa) and in neurologically healthy controls. We focused on the kinematics of one action, reaching to grasp a wooden block, which was performed within the context of two basic modes of social cognition, namely cooperation and competition. During the cooperative tasks, two participants were instructed to reach and grasp their respective objects and to cooperate in forming a specific configuration on the working table. During the competitive tasks, two participants were instructed to compete to place their own object at the bottom of a tower to be built on the working table. PD patients' ability to modulate motor patterning depending on the intention motivating the action they were about to perform was evaluated in both "on" (with L-Dopa) and "off" (without L-Dopa) states. Study results revealed that both the healthy controls and the 'on' PD patients had distinct kinematic patterns for cooperative and competitive actions and that these differed from patterns mirroring similar actions performed by those same participants in non social conditions. The kinematic patterns of the healthy controls and the 'on' patients were highly correlated during the cooperative tasks. The 'of PD patients were, instead, unable to differentiate between isolated and social conditions. These results support the hypothesis that dopaminergic neurotransmission is involved in shaping the mechanisms underlying social interactions.

It’s all in the type of the task: Dopamine modulates kinematic patterns during competitive vs. cooperative interaction in Parkinson’s disease

STRAULINO, ELISA;SCARAVILLI, TOMASO;BULGHERONI, MARIA;CASTIELLO, UMBERTO
2016

Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests that a dysfunctional dopaminergic system affects the ability to socially interact. Since Parkinson's disease (PD) provides a model for assessing dopaminergic dysfunctions in humans, our study was designed to investigate social interactions in PD patients receiving dopamine replacement therapy (Levodopa=L-Dopa) and in neurologically healthy controls. We focused on the kinematics of one action, reaching to grasp a wooden block, which was performed within the context of two basic modes of social cognition, namely cooperation and competition. During the cooperative tasks, two participants were instructed to reach and grasp their respective objects and to cooperate in forming a specific configuration on the working table. During the competitive tasks, two participants were instructed to compete to place their own object at the bottom of a tower to be built on the working table. PD patients' ability to modulate motor patterning depending on the intention motivating the action they were about to perform was evaluated in both "on" (with L-Dopa) and "off" (without L-Dopa) states. Study results revealed that both the healthy controls and the 'on' PD patients had distinct kinematic patterns for cooperative and competitive actions and that these differed from patterns mirroring similar actions performed by those same participants in non social conditions. The kinematic patterns of the healthy controls and the 'on' patients were highly correlated during the cooperative tasks. The 'of PD patients were, instead, unable to differentiate between isolated and social conditions. These results support the hypothesis that dopaminergic neurotransmission is involved in shaping the mechanisms underlying social interactions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3216298
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