Although involvement in childcare activities seems to promote better physical and mental health in older adults, its impact on cognitive status and depression has not yet been fully elucidated. We aimed to analyze the association between engagement in childcare activities and cognitive and psychological status over a 4.4-year period in community-dwelling older adults. Two thousand one hundred four subjects older than 65 years without severe cognitive impairment at baseline were categorized according to the frequency of their involvement in childcare activities (everyday, occasionally, never). The participants' cognitive status and depressive symptoms were evaluated at baseline and after 4.4 years. During the follow-up, 269 (12.8%) new cases of cognitive impairment and 229 (10.9%) new cases of depression were registered. Men engaged in childcare showed an almost 20% lower risk of cognitive impairment and cognitive decline. Women demonstrated similar results, except for those occasionally involved in childcare, who had a higher risk of cognitive decline compared with women who never engaged in it. The risk of developing depression was reduced in men involved daily (OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.30-0.62, p < 0.0001) and occasionally in childcare, who also demonstrated a lower risk of exacerbating depressive symptoms compared with subjects who never involved in it. The onset of depression was reduced in women occasionally engaged in childcare (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.56-0.82, p < 0.0001), but not significantly in those daily involved in it. Involvement of older adults in childcare activities seems to lower the risk of cognitive impairment in both genders and to prevent onset or worsening of depression particularly in older men

The effect of childcare activities on cognitive status and depression in older adults: Gender differences in a 4.4-year longitudinal study

Trevisan, Caterina;Maggi, Stefania;BAGGIO, GIOVANNELLA;SARTORI, LEONARDO;PERISSINOTTO, EGLE;MANZATO, ENZO;SERGI, GIUSEPPE
2018

Abstract

Although involvement in childcare activities seems to promote better physical and mental health in older adults, its impact on cognitive status and depression has not yet been fully elucidated. We aimed to analyze the association between engagement in childcare activities and cognitive and psychological status over a 4.4-year period in community-dwelling older adults. Two thousand one hundred four subjects older than 65 years without severe cognitive impairment at baseline were categorized according to the frequency of their involvement in childcare activities (everyday, occasionally, never). The participants' cognitive status and depressive symptoms were evaluated at baseline and after 4.4 years. During the follow-up, 269 (12.8%) new cases of cognitive impairment and 229 (10.9%) new cases of depression were registered. Men engaged in childcare showed an almost 20% lower risk of cognitive impairment and cognitive decline. Women demonstrated similar results, except for those occasionally involved in childcare, who had a higher risk of cognitive decline compared with women who never engaged in it. The risk of developing depression was reduced in men involved daily (OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.30-0.62, p < 0.0001) and occasionally in childcare, who also demonstrated a lower risk of exacerbating depressive symptoms compared with subjects who never involved in it. The onset of depression was reduced in women occasionally engaged in childcare (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.56-0.82, p < 0.0001), but not significantly in those daily involved in it. Involvement of older adults in childcare activities seems to lower the risk of cognitive impairment in both genders and to prevent onset or worsening of depression particularly in older men
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3239432
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