Objective: Hyperuricemia is frequent in older people and associated with several medical conditions. The relationship between hyperuricemia and physical performance is limited. We aimed to investigate the association between hyperuricemia and physical performance over a 4.4-year followup in the elderly. Methods: A total of 1,904 community-dwelling older participants were followed for a mean of 4.4 years. Hyperuricemia at baseline was defined using serum uric acid concentrations ≥6 and ≥7 mg/dl for women and men, respectively. Objective physical performance tests measured included the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), 4-meter gait speed, chair-stands time, leg extension and flexion, handgrip strength, and the 6-minute walking test. Results: At baseline, participants with hyperuricemia (n = 98 men, 232 women) scored significantly worse in all the tests investigated. After adjusting for 19 covariates, men with hyperuricemia at baseline had an increased risk of having poor SPPB scores at followup (odds ratio [OR] 1.44 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.21–1.72]; P < 0.0001), poor chair-stands time (OR 1.40 [95% CI 1.18–1.6]; P < 0.0001), poor leg extension (OR 1.47 [95% CI 1.21–1.7]; P < 0.0001), and poor handgrip strength (OR 1.54 [95% CI 1.24–1.90]; P < 0.0001). Among women, hyperuricemia was associated with an increased risk of having poor scores in all the SPPB items and in leg flexion (OR 1.26 [95% CI 1.08–1.49]; P = 0.03). Conclusion: Hyperuricemia seems to be significantly associated with poor physical performance in older people, over a followup of 4.4 years. The relationship appears to be more consistent in men than in women. Further longitudinal research is required to better understand the relationships and potential biologic pathways.

Results of an Observational Cohort Study of Hyperuricemia as a Predictor of Poor Physical Performance in the Elderly

VERONESE, NICOLA;TREVISAN, CATERINA;DE RUI, MARINA;Sartori, Leonardo;MUSACCHIO, ESTELLA;Perissinotto, Egle;Manzato, Enzo;Sergi, Giuseppe
2017

Abstract

Objective: Hyperuricemia is frequent in older people and associated with several medical conditions. The relationship between hyperuricemia and physical performance is limited. We aimed to investigate the association between hyperuricemia and physical performance over a 4.4-year followup in the elderly. Methods: A total of 1,904 community-dwelling older participants were followed for a mean of 4.4 years. Hyperuricemia at baseline was defined using serum uric acid concentrations ≥6 and ≥7 mg/dl for women and men, respectively. Objective physical performance tests measured included the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), 4-meter gait speed, chair-stands time, leg extension and flexion, handgrip strength, and the 6-minute walking test. Results: At baseline, participants with hyperuricemia (n = 98 men, 232 women) scored significantly worse in all the tests investigated. After adjusting for 19 covariates, men with hyperuricemia at baseline had an increased risk of having poor SPPB scores at followup (odds ratio [OR] 1.44 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.21–1.72]; P < 0.0001), poor chair-stands time (OR 1.40 [95% CI 1.18–1.6]; P < 0.0001), poor leg extension (OR 1.47 [95% CI 1.21–1.7]; P < 0.0001), and poor handgrip strength (OR 1.54 [95% CI 1.24–1.90]; P < 0.0001). Among women, hyperuricemia was associated with an increased risk of having poor scores in all the SPPB items and in leg flexion (OR 1.26 [95% CI 1.08–1.49]; P = 0.03). Conclusion: Hyperuricemia seems to be significantly associated with poor physical performance in older people, over a followup of 4.4 years. The relationship appears to be more consistent in men than in women. Further longitudinal research is required to better understand the relationships and potential biologic pathways.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3250461
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