Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of [18F]fluorocholine positron emis- sion tomography/computed tomography (FCH PET/CT) in detecting lymph-node and bone involvement in comparison with conventional imaging, such as abdominal–pelvic CT and bone scan, in the initial staging of prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and methods. The study retro- spectively evaluated 48 patients who had FCH PET/CT for the initial staging of PCa. At the same time, 32 of the 48 patients had a bone scan and 26 of the 48 patients had abdominal–pelvic diag- nostic CT. Diagnostic performance of FCH PET/CT, i.e. sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, was evaluated on a per-patient basis for the whole population and then separately on a per-risk clas- sification, and later in comparison with conventional imaging. Histological specimens or follow- up data were used as the standard of reference. Results. The overall accuracy of FCH PET/CT for lymph-node involvement was 83.3%. The sensitivity of FCH was higher in the high-risk subset (83.3%) than in the intermediate-risk group (33.3%), whereas FCH specificity was similar. In com- parison with dedicated CT scan, FCH PET/CT showed a higher sensitivity and a similar specificity (46.2% vs 69.2% and 92.3% vs 92.3%, respectively). Moreover, the sensitivity and specificity of PET/CT were higher than those of bone scan (100% vs 90% and 86.4% vs 77.2%, respectively). In contrast with conventional imaging, PET/CT changed the staging of the PCa in 33.3% patients. Conclusions. The efficiency of FCH PET/CT in detecting both bone and lymph-node involvement of PCa at initial staging was found to be higher than that of conventional imaging. Prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

Comparison between conventional imaging (abdominal-pelvic computed tomography and bone scan) and [18F]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging for the initial staging of patients with intermediate- tohigh-risk prostate cancer: A retrospective analysis

Zattoni, Fabio
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Guttilla, Andrea
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Zattoni, Filiberto
Supervision
;
Saladini, Giorgio
Supervision
2015

Abstract

Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of [18F]fluorocholine positron emis- sion tomography/computed tomography (FCH PET/CT) in detecting lymph-node and bone involvement in comparison with conventional imaging, such as abdominal–pelvic CT and bone scan, in the initial staging of prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and methods. The study retro- spectively evaluated 48 patients who had FCH PET/CT for the initial staging of PCa. At the same time, 32 of the 48 patients had a bone scan and 26 of the 48 patients had abdominal–pelvic diag- nostic CT. Diagnostic performance of FCH PET/CT, i.e. sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, was evaluated on a per-patient basis for the whole population and then separately on a per-risk clas- sification, and later in comparison with conventional imaging. Histological specimens or follow- up data were used as the standard of reference. Results. The overall accuracy of FCH PET/CT for lymph-node involvement was 83.3%. The sensitivity of FCH was higher in the high-risk subset (83.3%) than in the intermediate-risk group (33.3%), whereas FCH specificity was similar. In com- parison with dedicated CT scan, FCH PET/CT showed a higher sensitivity and a similar specificity (46.2% vs 69.2% and 92.3% vs 92.3%, respectively). Moreover, the sensitivity and specificity of PET/CT were higher than those of bone scan (100% vs 90% and 86.4% vs 77.2%, respectively). In contrast with conventional imaging, PET/CT changed the staging of the PCa in 33.3% patients. Conclusions. The efficiency of FCH PET/CT in detecting both bone and lymph-node involvement of PCa at initial staging was found to be higher than that of conventional imaging. Prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3260660
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