BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: World Health Organization guidelines recommend covering the head during kangaroo mother care (KMC), but the effect of a cap on neonatal thermal control during KMC remains to be defined. Our objective was to assess the effectiveness and safety of a woolen cap in maintaining low birth weight infants (LBWIs) in normal thermal range during KMC. METHODS: Three hundred LBWI candidates for KMC in 3 African hospitals were randomly assigned to KMC with (CAP group) or without (NOCAP group) a woolen cap in a 1:1 ratio during the first week after birth. Axillary temperature was measured every 6 hours. Maternal and room temperature and adherence to skin-to-skin contact were registered at the same time points. RESULTS: A total number of 5064 measurements were recorded (median 19 measurements per subject; interquartile range: 10–25). Mean time spent in normal temperature range was 55% (SD 24) in CAP and 56% (SD 24) in NOCAP groups. Multivariable analysis estimated a rate ratio of 0.92 (95% confidence interval: 0.84 to 1.00; P = .06) for the effect of the cap versus no cap on time spent in the normal temperature range. CONCLUSIONS: In these 3 African, low-resource settings and so many days post birth, the use of a woolen cap was safe but provided no advantages in maintaining LBWI in the normal thermal range while being in a KMC ward. LBWIs spent only half of the time in the normal temperature range despite warm rooms and skin-to-skin contact. Maintaining normothermia in LBWIs remains an unfinished challenge in low-resource settings.

Thermal effect of a woolen cap in low birth weight infants during kangaroo care

Cavallin, Francesco;Pizzol, Damiano;LUSIANI, MARTA;Da Dalt, Liviana;Trevisanuto, Daniele;Putoto, Giovanni
2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: World Health Organization guidelines recommend covering the head during kangaroo mother care (KMC), but the effect of a cap on neonatal thermal control during KMC remains to be defined. Our objective was to assess the effectiveness and safety of a woolen cap in maintaining low birth weight infants (LBWIs) in normal thermal range during KMC. METHODS: Three hundred LBWI candidates for KMC in 3 African hospitals were randomly assigned to KMC with (CAP group) or without (NOCAP group) a woolen cap in a 1:1 ratio during the first week after birth. Axillary temperature was measured every 6 hours. Maternal and room temperature and adherence to skin-to-skin contact were registered at the same time points. RESULTS: A total number of 5064 measurements were recorded (median 19 measurements per subject; interquartile range: 10–25). Mean time spent in normal temperature range was 55% (SD 24) in CAP and 56% (SD 24) in NOCAP groups. Multivariable analysis estimated a rate ratio of 0.92 (95% confidence interval: 0.84 to 1.00; P = .06) for the effect of the cap versus no cap on time spent in the normal temperature range. CONCLUSIONS: In these 3 African, low-resource settings and so many days post birth, the use of a woolen cap was safe but provided no advantages in maintaining LBWI in the normal thermal range while being in a KMC ward. LBWIs spent only half of the time in the normal temperature range despite warm rooms and skin-to-skin contact. Maintaining normothermia in LBWIs remains an unfinished challenge in low-resource settings.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3271697
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