Background: Few studies have examined optimal treatment specifically for cervical esophageal carcinoma. This study evaluated the outcome of three common treatment strategies with a focus on the debated role of surgery. Methods: All patients with cervical esophageal cancer treated at a single center were identified and their outcomes analyzed in terms of morbidity, mortality, and recurrence according to the treatment they received, i.e. surgery alone, definitive platinum-based chemoradiation (CRT), or CRT followed by surgery. Results: The study population included 148 patients with cervical esophageal cancer from a prospective database of 3445 patients. Primary surgery was the treatment of choice for 56 (37.83%) patients, definitive CRT was the treatment of choice for 52 (35.13%) patients, and CRT followed by surgery was the treatment of choice for 40 (27.02%) patients. CRT-treated patients obtained 36.96% complete clinical response, with overall morbidity and mortality rates of 36.95 and 2.17%, respectively. Surgical complete resection was achieved in 71.88% of surgically treated cases, with morbidity and mortality rates of 52.17 and 6.25%, respectively. No significant survival difference existed among the three treatments, but patients who underwent surgery alone had a significantly lower stage of disease (p = 0.031). Compared with patients with complete response after CRT, surgery did not confer any significant survival benefit, and overall 5-year survival was lower than definitive CRT alone. In contrast, surgery improved survival significantly in patients with non-complete response after definitive CRT (p = 0.023). Conclusions: Definitive platinum-based CRT should be the treatment of choice for cervical esophageal cancer. Surgery has a role for patients with non-complete response as it adds significant survival benefit, with acceptable morbidity and mortality. © 2018 Society of Surgical Oncology

Cervical Esophageal Cancer Treatment Strategies: A Cohort Study Appraising the Debated Role of Surgery

Valmasoni, Michele;Pierobon, Elisa Sefora;Zanchettin, Gianpietro;Briscolini, Dario;Moletta, Lucia;Salvador, Renato;Merigliano, Stefano
2018

Abstract

Background: Few studies have examined optimal treatment specifically for cervical esophageal carcinoma. This study evaluated the outcome of three common treatment strategies with a focus on the debated role of surgery. Methods: All patients with cervical esophageal cancer treated at a single center were identified and their outcomes analyzed in terms of morbidity, mortality, and recurrence according to the treatment they received, i.e. surgery alone, definitive platinum-based chemoradiation (CRT), or CRT followed by surgery. Results: The study population included 148 patients with cervical esophageal cancer from a prospective database of 3445 patients. Primary surgery was the treatment of choice for 56 (37.83%) patients, definitive CRT was the treatment of choice for 52 (35.13%) patients, and CRT followed by surgery was the treatment of choice for 40 (27.02%) patients. CRT-treated patients obtained 36.96% complete clinical response, with overall morbidity and mortality rates of 36.95 and 2.17%, respectively. Surgical complete resection was achieved in 71.88% of surgically treated cases, with morbidity and mortality rates of 52.17 and 6.25%, respectively. No significant survival difference existed among the three treatments, but patients who underwent surgery alone had a significantly lower stage of disease (p = 0.031). Compared with patients with complete response after CRT, surgery did not confer any significant survival benefit, and overall 5-year survival was lower than definitive CRT alone. In contrast, surgery improved survival significantly in patients with non-complete response after definitive CRT (p = 0.023). Conclusions: Definitive platinum-based CRT should be the treatment of choice for cervical esophageal cancer. Surgery has a role for patients with non-complete response as it adds significant survival benefit, with acceptable morbidity and mortality. © 2018 Society of Surgical Oncology
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3272277
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