Aim: Aetiologies of first-ever convulsive seizures may be diverse, not all leading to recurrence or epilepsy diagnosis. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of first-ever convulsive seizures in children, investigating risk factors for recurrence and epilepsy diagnosis. Method: This was a retrospective study of children presenting with a first-ever convulsive seizure to a tertiary-care paediatric emergency department (PED) in Italy, in a 12-month period (2011-2012). Results: One hundred and eight children (57 males, 51 females) presented to the PED for a first-ever convulsive seizure; 90.7% were 6 months to 6 years old (median age 1y 10mo, mean 2y 7mo, range 0mo-14y 4mo). Seizure duration was less than 5 minutes in 76.8%. Seizures were 'unprovoked' in 19.4% and 'provoked' in 80.6%. At 4-year follow-up, 37.9% of patients experienced recurrence and 13.6% received a diagnosis of epilepsy. Factors significantly associated with recurrence were the 'unprovoked' nature of the first seizure, multiple seizures in the first 24 hours, positive family history of febrile seizures or epilepsy, and pre-existing neurological conditions/problems. Factors significantly associated with a diagnosis of epilepsy were the 'unprovoked' nature of the first seizure, age older than 6 years, pre-existing neurological conditions/problems, and focal onset of first seizure. Interpretation: Children presenting to the PED with first-ever convulsive seizures represent a heterogeneous group. The identification of prognostic factors for recurrence and epilepsy diagnosis may help provide tailored counselling and follow-up. What this paper adds: Seizures were 'unprovoked' in 19.4% and 'provoked' in 80.6% of children presenting to the emergency department. At 4-year follow-up, 37.9% relapsed, and 13.6% received a diagnosis of epilepsy. 'Unprovoked' first seizure, family history of febrile seizures, and pre-existing neurological conditions were associated with recurrence. 'Unprovoked' first seizure, age younger than 6 years, and pre-existing neurological conditions were associated with epilepsy diagnosis.

First-ever convulsive seizures in children presenting to the emergency department: risk factors for seizure recurrence and diagnosis of epilepsy.

Sartori S;Nosadini M;TESSARIN, GIULIO;Boniver C;Frigo AC;Toldo I;Bressan S;Da Dalt L.
2019

Abstract

Aim: Aetiologies of first-ever convulsive seizures may be diverse, not all leading to recurrence or epilepsy diagnosis. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of first-ever convulsive seizures in children, investigating risk factors for recurrence and epilepsy diagnosis. Method: This was a retrospective study of children presenting with a first-ever convulsive seizure to a tertiary-care paediatric emergency department (PED) in Italy, in a 12-month period (2011-2012). Results: One hundred and eight children (57 males, 51 females) presented to the PED for a first-ever convulsive seizure; 90.7% were 6 months to 6 years old (median age 1y 10mo, mean 2y 7mo, range 0mo-14y 4mo). Seizure duration was less than 5 minutes in 76.8%. Seizures were 'unprovoked' in 19.4% and 'provoked' in 80.6%. At 4-year follow-up, 37.9% of patients experienced recurrence and 13.6% received a diagnosis of epilepsy. Factors significantly associated with recurrence were the 'unprovoked' nature of the first seizure, multiple seizures in the first 24 hours, positive family history of febrile seizures or epilepsy, and pre-existing neurological conditions/problems. Factors significantly associated with a diagnosis of epilepsy were the 'unprovoked' nature of the first seizure, age older than 6 years, pre-existing neurological conditions/problems, and focal onset of first seizure. Interpretation: Children presenting to the PED with first-ever convulsive seizures represent a heterogeneous group. The identification of prognostic factors for recurrence and epilepsy diagnosis may help provide tailored counselling and follow-up. What this paper adds: Seizures were 'unprovoked' in 19.4% and 'provoked' in 80.6% of children presenting to the emergency department. At 4-year follow-up, 37.9% relapsed, and 13.6% received a diagnosis of epilepsy. 'Unprovoked' first seizure, family history of febrile seizures, and pre-existing neurological conditions were associated with recurrence. 'Unprovoked' first seizure, age younger than 6 years, and pre-existing neurological conditions were associated with epilepsy diagnosis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3278875
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