Background. In basketball a maximum accuracy at every game intensity is required while shooting. The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of three different drill intensity simulation protocols on jump shot accuracy in expert and junior basketball players.Materials & Methods. Eleven expert players (age 26 +/- 6 yrs, weight 86 +/- 11 kg, height 192 +/- 8 cm) and ten junior players (age 18 +/- 1 yrs, weight 75 +/- 12 kg, height 184 +/- 9 cm) completed three series of twenty jump shots at three different levels of exertion. Counter Movement Jump (CMJ) height was also measured after each series of jump shots. Exertions intensity was induced manipulating the basketball drills. Heart rate was measured for the whole duration of the tests while the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was collected at the end of each series of shots.Results. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were statistically different in the three conditions for both expert and junior players. CMJ height remained almost unchanged in both groups. Jump shot accuracy decreased with increasing drills intensity both in experts and junior players. Expert players showed higher accuracy than junior players for all the three levels of exertion (83% vs 64%, p < 0.001; 75% vs 57%, p < 0.05; 76% vs 60%, p < 0.01). Moreover, for the most demanding level of exertion, experts showed a higher accuracy in the last ten shots compared to the first ten shots (82% vs 70%, p < 0.05).Discussion. Experts coped better with the different exertions intensities, thus maintaining a higher level of performance. The introduction of technical short bouts of high-intensity sport-specific exercises into skill sessions should be proposed to improve jump shot accuracy during matches.

Different intensities of basketball drills affect jump shot accuracy of expert and junior players

Marcolin, Giuseppe;Panizzolo, Fausto Antonio;Grigoletto, Davide;Paoli, Antonio
2018

Abstract

Background. In basketball a maximum accuracy at every game intensity is required while shooting. The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of three different drill intensity simulation protocols on jump shot accuracy in expert and junior basketball players.Materials & Methods. Eleven expert players (age 26 +/- 6 yrs, weight 86 +/- 11 kg, height 192 +/- 8 cm) and ten junior players (age 18 +/- 1 yrs, weight 75 +/- 12 kg, height 184 +/- 9 cm) completed three series of twenty jump shots at three different levels of exertion. Counter Movement Jump (CMJ) height was also measured after each series of jump shots. Exertions intensity was induced manipulating the basketball drills. Heart rate was measured for the whole duration of the tests while the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was collected at the end of each series of shots.Results. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were statistically different in the three conditions for both expert and junior players. CMJ height remained almost unchanged in both groups. Jump shot accuracy decreased with increasing drills intensity both in experts and junior players. Expert players showed higher accuracy than junior players for all the three levels of exertion (83% vs 64%, p < 0.001; 75% vs 57%, p < 0.05; 76% vs 60%, p < 0.01). Moreover, for the most demanding level of exertion, experts showed a higher accuracy in the last ten shots compared to the first ten shots (82% vs 70%, p < 0.05).Discussion. Experts coped better with the different exertions intensities, thus maintaining a higher level of performance. The introduction of technical short bouts of high-intensity sport-specific exercises into skill sessions should be proposed to improve jump shot accuracy during matches.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3285702
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