Background: As intrapartum-related events represent a quarter of all neonatal deaths, education on neonatal resuscitation is a critical priority. Objective: To assess the impact of a low-dose/high-frequency neonatal resuscitation training on clinical practice of midwives in a low-resource setting. Methods: Eight months after a modified Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) course, we implemented a low-dose/high-frequency training for midwives at Beira Central Hospital, Mozambique. The training lasted 6 months and included weekly practice sessions. Fifty consecutive resuscitations after the low-dose/high-frequency training were compared with those registered before (n = 50) and after (n = 50) participation in the adapted NRP course using video recording. Results: All 150 neonates received the initial steps; 103 required bag-mask ventilation and 41 required chest compressions. The scores for initial steps, bag-mask ventilation and chest compressions improved after the course (p < 0.0001, p = 0.005 and p = 0.03) and did not change after the low-dose/high-frequency training (p = 0.34, p = 0.99 and p = 0.30). The low-dose/high-frequency training decreased the total time of the procedure (p < 0.0001) and anticipated start time of airway suctioning and tactile stimulation (p = 0.003 and p < 0.0001), but had no effect on the time of initiation of bag-mask ventilation (p = 0.30). Conclusions: In a low- income setting, a low-dose/high-frequency training after participation in an adapted NRP course contributed to improving the initiation and times of some procedures. However, many aspects of neonatal resuscitation remained poor. Low-dose/high-frequency training should focus on improving the prevention of thermal loss, face mask ventilation and heart rate assessment.

Effect of a Low-Dose/High-Frequency Training on Real-Life Neonatal Resuscitation in a Low-Resource Setting

Cavicchiolo, Maria Elena;Cavallin, Francesco;BERTUOLA, FEDERICA;Pizzol, Damiano;Da Dalt, Liviana;Trevisanuto, Daniele
2018

Abstract

Background: As intrapartum-related events represent a quarter of all neonatal deaths, education on neonatal resuscitation is a critical priority. Objective: To assess the impact of a low-dose/high-frequency neonatal resuscitation training on clinical practice of midwives in a low-resource setting. Methods: Eight months after a modified Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) course, we implemented a low-dose/high-frequency training for midwives at Beira Central Hospital, Mozambique. The training lasted 6 months and included weekly practice sessions. Fifty consecutive resuscitations after the low-dose/high-frequency training were compared with those registered before (n = 50) and after (n = 50) participation in the adapted NRP course using video recording. Results: All 150 neonates received the initial steps; 103 required bag-mask ventilation and 41 required chest compressions. The scores for initial steps, bag-mask ventilation and chest compressions improved after the course (p < 0.0001, p = 0.005 and p = 0.03) and did not change after the low-dose/high-frequency training (p = 0.34, p = 0.99 and p = 0.30). The low-dose/high-frequency training decreased the total time of the procedure (p < 0.0001) and anticipated start time of airway suctioning and tactile stimulation (p = 0.003 and p < 0.0001), but had no effect on the time of initiation of bag-mask ventilation (p = 0.30). Conclusions: In a low- income setting, a low-dose/high-frequency training after participation in an adapted NRP course contributed to improving the initiation and times of some procedures. However, many aspects of neonatal resuscitation remained poor. Low-dose/high-frequency training should focus on improving the prevention of thermal loss, face mask ventilation and heart rate assessment.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3289589
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 12
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 13
social impact