Aim: To improve the genetic, clinical, and neuroradiological characterization of cerebellar involvement in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and determine whether cerebellar lesions could be a reliable biomarker of neurological impairment. Method: This retrospective cohort study, held at two tertiary paediatric university centres, was conducted on patients with a confirmed diagnosis of TSC who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging between October 2009 and May 2016. The study population consisted of 112 patients with TSC (median age 10y; range 5mo-38y; 61 females, 51 males). Results: The results from multivariable statistical analysis indicated that cerebellar involvement (34 out of 112 patients, none carrying a TSC1 mutation) was the most powerful predictor of supratentorial cortical tuber load; however, cerebellar involvement was not the best predictor of clinical phenotype when supratentorial tuber load and TSC2 mutations were taken into consideration. The association between cerebellar lesions and a more severe clinical and neuroradiological phenotype was statistically significant and may be due to its strong association with TSC2 mutations and higher cortical tuber load. Interpretation: Cerebellar involvement is not the best predictor of neurobehavioural outcome, including TSC-related autism, after adjusting for TSC2 and the number of cortical tubers. Its role in the TSC clinical phenotype needs to be investigated further. What this paper adds: Cerebellar involvement is a powerful predictor of supratentorial cortical involvement and a potential biomarker of disease severity. Cerebellar lesions significantly correlate with a more severe clinical and neuroradiological phenotype. Cerebellar involvement is not the best predictor of neurobehavioural outcome.

Cerebellar lesions as potential predictors of neurobehavioural phenotype in tuberous sclerosis complex.

Toldo I
;
Bugin S;Perissinotto E;Pelizza MF;Nosadini M;Sartori S;Manara R.
2019

Abstract

Aim: To improve the genetic, clinical, and neuroradiological characterization of cerebellar involvement in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and determine whether cerebellar lesions could be a reliable biomarker of neurological impairment. Method: This retrospective cohort study, held at two tertiary paediatric university centres, was conducted on patients with a confirmed diagnosis of TSC who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging between October 2009 and May 2016. The study population consisted of 112 patients with TSC (median age 10y; range 5mo-38y; 61 females, 51 males). Results: The results from multivariable statistical analysis indicated that cerebellar involvement (34 out of 112 patients, none carrying a TSC1 mutation) was the most powerful predictor of supratentorial cortical tuber load; however, cerebellar involvement was not the best predictor of clinical phenotype when supratentorial tuber load and TSC2 mutations were taken into consideration. The association between cerebellar lesions and a more severe clinical and neuroradiological phenotype was statistically significant and may be due to its strong association with TSC2 mutations and higher cortical tuber load. Interpretation: Cerebellar involvement is not the best predictor of neurobehavioural outcome, including TSC-related autism, after adjusting for TSC2 and the number of cortical tubers. Its role in the TSC clinical phenotype needs to be investigated further. What this paper adds: Cerebellar involvement is a powerful predictor of supratentorial cortical involvement and a potential biomarker of disease severity. Cerebellar lesions significantly correlate with a more severe clinical and neuroradiological phenotype. Cerebellar involvement is not the best predictor of neurobehavioural outcome.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3305001
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