Bacteriophages are responsible for significant material and time losses in the dairy industry. This because these viruses infect the selected lactic starter cultures used for milk fermentation, i.e., the first stage toward cheese production. Standard detection techniques are timeand labor-consuming, causing huge costs related to production plant sanitation and product wasting. A new type of biosensor for early detection of bacteriophage contamination is highly demanded by the milk processing market, and inkjet-printed electrochemical sensors could be the answer. Inkjet printing is a well-known technology that has been revisited in recent years, using silver nanoparticle (AgNP) based inks for low-cost and easy fabrication of sensing and biosensing systems on flexible and eco-compatible substrates. In this research, we studied inkjet printing for the manufacturing of both interdigitated electrodes arrays (IDEAs), and a versatile system to monitor bacterial cultures by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In particular, we studied this biosensing system for the detection of bacteriophages by comparing its performance with standard microbiological methods. We performed electrical and morphological characterizations of the devices produced with a consumer-use inkjet printer with commercial AgNPs ink on flexible substrates, such as office paper, polyethylene (PET), and photo paper. We used light microscopy optical analysis, profilometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging to define the objects resolution, their real dimensions, and thickness. We also investigated the devices’ conductivity and layout, by EIS measurements with a standard buffer solution, i.e., phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Finally, we tested our system by monitoring Lactococcus lactis cultures and bacteriophage infection. We compared the results to those obtained by two standard microbiological methods in terms of response time, proving that our technique requires less than half the time of other methods and no specialized personnel.

Inkjet printed interdigitated biosensor for easy and rapid detection of bacteriophage contamination: A preliminary study for milk processing control applications

Rosati G.;Scaramuzza M.;De Toni A.;Paccagnella A.
2019

Abstract

Bacteriophages are responsible for significant material and time losses in the dairy industry. This because these viruses infect the selected lactic starter cultures used for milk fermentation, i.e., the first stage toward cheese production. Standard detection techniques are timeand labor-consuming, causing huge costs related to production plant sanitation and product wasting. A new type of biosensor for early detection of bacteriophage contamination is highly demanded by the milk processing market, and inkjet-printed electrochemical sensors could be the answer. Inkjet printing is a well-known technology that has been revisited in recent years, using silver nanoparticle (AgNP) based inks for low-cost and easy fabrication of sensing and biosensing systems on flexible and eco-compatible substrates. In this research, we studied inkjet printing for the manufacturing of both interdigitated electrodes arrays (IDEAs), and a versatile system to monitor bacterial cultures by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In particular, we studied this biosensing system for the detection of bacteriophages by comparing its performance with standard microbiological methods. We performed electrical and morphological characterizations of the devices produced with a consumer-use inkjet printer with commercial AgNPs ink on flexible substrates, such as office paper, polyethylene (PET), and photo paper. We used light microscopy optical analysis, profilometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging to define the objects resolution, their real dimensions, and thickness. We also investigated the devices’ conductivity and layout, by EIS measurements with a standard buffer solution, i.e., phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Finally, we tested our system by monitoring Lactococcus lactis cultures and bacteriophage infection. We compared the results to those obtained by two standard microbiological methods in terms of response time, proving that our technique requires less than half the time of other methods and no specialized personnel.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
chemosensors-07-00008-v2.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Versione dell'editore
Tipologia: Published (publisher's version)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 4.11 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
4.11 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3313794
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 14
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 11
social impact