BACKGROUND: End-stage renal disease patients living with a kidney transplant (KT) often present with frailty, functional disability, and mobility impairments that may result in a high risk of falls. Postural balance and muscle strength are implicated in the etiology of falls in the geriatric population, and both may be impaired in KT patients. RESEARCH QUESTION: We conducted a cross-sectional investigation to estimate the prevalence of falls, as well as to explore the association between postural balance, muscle strength and history of falls in end-stage renal disease patients living with a KT. METHODS: Fifty-nine prevalent KT patients (age = 53.2 ± 11 years) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Participants were classified as fallers/non-fallers and underwent an objectively-measured assessment of postural balance on a stabilometric platform in eyes open (EO), eyes closed (EC), and dual-task (DT) conditions. Center of pressure (CoP) variables were taken for the analysis. In addition, participants underwent isometric (IM) and isokinetic (IK) assessments of lower limb muscle strength on a multi-joint evaluation system. RESULTS: Thirty-four percent of the study participants reported at least one fall in the previous 12 months. In logistic regression analysis, CoP velocity in EO (OR: 1.23, 95 % CI: 1.06-1.43, p = .007), and IK ankle dorsiflexion strength (OR: 0.87, 95 % CI: 0.77-0.99, p = .034) were independently associated with increased odds of falling. SIGNIFICANCE: This cross-sectional study indicates that patients living with a KT presented with a prevalence of falls indicative of a high risk of falling. Postural balance and muscle strength are exercise-modifiable factors and further research is warranted to establish to what extent these measures may be implicated in the etiology of falling in this patient group. Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Postural balance, muscle strength, and history of falls in end-stage renal disease patients living with a kidney transplant: A cross-sectional study

Gobbo, Stefano;Bullo, Valentina;Vendramin, Barbara;Roma, Enrico;Duregon, Federica;Furian, Lucrezia;Di Bella, Caterina;Neunhaeuserer, Daniel;Battista, Francesca;Bergamin, Marco
;
Ermolao, Andrea
2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: End-stage renal disease patients living with a kidney transplant (KT) often present with frailty, functional disability, and mobility impairments that may result in a high risk of falls. Postural balance and muscle strength are implicated in the etiology of falls in the geriatric population, and both may be impaired in KT patients. RESEARCH QUESTION: We conducted a cross-sectional investigation to estimate the prevalence of falls, as well as to explore the association between postural balance, muscle strength and history of falls in end-stage renal disease patients living with a KT. METHODS: Fifty-nine prevalent KT patients (age = 53.2 ± 11 years) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Participants were classified as fallers/non-fallers and underwent an objectively-measured assessment of postural balance on a stabilometric platform in eyes open (EO), eyes closed (EC), and dual-task (DT) conditions. Center of pressure (CoP) variables were taken for the analysis. In addition, participants underwent isometric (IM) and isokinetic (IK) assessments of lower limb muscle strength on a multi-joint evaluation system. RESULTS: Thirty-four percent of the study participants reported at least one fall in the previous 12 months. In logistic regression analysis, CoP velocity in EO (OR: 1.23, 95 % CI: 1.06-1.43, p = .007), and IK ankle dorsiflexion strength (OR: 0.87, 95 % CI: 0.77-0.99, p = .034) were independently associated with increased odds of falling. SIGNIFICANCE: This cross-sectional study indicates that patients living with a KT presented with a prevalence of falls indicative of a high risk of falling. Postural balance and muscle strength are exercise-modifiable factors and further research is warranted to establish to what extent these measures may be implicated in the etiology of falling in this patient group. Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier B.V.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3318849
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