Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most severe forms of inherited muscular dystrophies. The disease is caused by the lack of dystrophin, a structurally essential protein; hence, a definitive cure would necessarily have to pass through some form of gene and/or cell therapy. Cell- and genetic-based therapeutics for DMD have been explored since the 1990s; recently, two of the latter have been approved for clinical use, but their efficacy is still very low. In parallel, there have been great ongoing efforts aimed at targeting the downstream pathogenic effects of dystrophin deficiency using classical pharmacological approaches, with synthetic or biological molecules. However, as it is always the case with rare diseases, R&D costs for new drugs can represent a major hurdle for researchers and patients alike. This problem can be greatly alleviated by experimenting the use of molecules that had originally been developed for different conditions, a process known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning. In this review, we will describe the state of the art of such an approach for DMD, both in the context of clinical trials and pre-clinical studies.

Teaching an old molecule new tricks: Drug repositioning for duchenne muscular dystrophy

Vitiello L.;TIBAUDO, LUCIA;Pegoraro E.;Bello L.
;
Canton M.
2019

Abstract

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most severe forms of inherited muscular dystrophies. The disease is caused by the lack of dystrophin, a structurally essential protein; hence, a definitive cure would necessarily have to pass through some form of gene and/or cell therapy. Cell- and genetic-based therapeutics for DMD have been explored since the 1990s; recently, two of the latter have been approved for clinical use, but their efficacy is still very low. In parallel, there have been great ongoing efforts aimed at targeting the downstream pathogenic effects of dystrophin deficiency using classical pharmacological approaches, with synthetic or biological molecules. However, as it is always the case with rare diseases, R&D costs for new drugs can represent a major hurdle for researchers and patients alike. This problem can be greatly alleviated by experimenting the use of molecules that had originally been developed for different conditions, a process known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning. In this review, we will describe the state of the art of such an approach for DMD, both in the context of clinical trials and pre-clinical studies.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3319890
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