Background: High fidelity simulation has been executed to allow the evaluation of technical and non-technical skills of health caregivers. Our objective was to assess technical and non-technical performances of low level hospitals health caregivers who attended a Neonatal Resuscitation course using high fidelity simulation in a standard-setting scenario. Methods: Twenty-three volunteers were asked to manage a simple scenario (infant with secondary apnea) after the course. Technical and non-technical skills were assessed by using previously published scores. Performances were assessed during the scenario and after 2 months by filmed video recordings. Results: Sixteen (69.5%) participants failed to pass the minimum required technical score. Staff experience and participation in previous courses were associated to higher score in technical and non-technical skills, while working in level I or II hospitals did not affect the scores. Previous experience in neonatal resuscitation requiring positive pressure ventilation was associated to better non-technical performance. Technical and non-technical scores were significantly correlated (r = 0.67, p = 0.0005). Delayed and direct evaluation of technical skills provided the same scores. Conclusions: A neonatal resuscitation course, performed by using a high fidelity simulation manikin, had a limited impact on technical and non-technical skills of participants working in low level hospitals. Training programs should be tailored to the participants’ professional background and to the more relevant sessions.

Performances of low level hospital health caregivers after a neonatal resuscitation course

Cavallin F.;Mardegan V.;Trevisanuto D.
Conceptualization
2016

Abstract

Background: High fidelity simulation has been executed to allow the evaluation of technical and non-technical skills of health caregivers. Our objective was to assess technical and non-technical performances of low level hospitals health caregivers who attended a Neonatal Resuscitation course using high fidelity simulation in a standard-setting scenario. Methods: Twenty-three volunteers were asked to manage a simple scenario (infant with secondary apnea) after the course. Technical and non-technical skills were assessed by using previously published scores. Performances were assessed during the scenario and after 2 months by filmed video recordings. Results: Sixteen (69.5%) participants failed to pass the minimum required technical score. Staff experience and participation in previous courses were associated to higher score in technical and non-technical skills, while working in level I or II hospitals did not affect the scores. Previous experience in neonatal resuscitation requiring positive pressure ventilation was associated to better non-technical performance. Technical and non-technical scores were significantly correlated (r = 0.67, p = 0.0005). Delayed and direct evaluation of technical skills provided the same scores. Conclusions: A neonatal resuscitation course, performed by using a high fidelity simulation manikin, had a limited impact on technical and non-technical skills of participants working in low level hospitals. Training programs should be tailored to the participants’ professional background and to the more relevant sessions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3328212
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