Even though bariatric surgery is one of the most effective treatment option of obesity, post-surgical weight loss is not always ensured, especially in the long term, when many patients experience weight regain. Bariatric procedures are largely based on surgeon's expertise and intra-operative decisions, while an integrated in-silico approach could support surgical activity. The effects of bariatric surgery on gastric distension, which activates the neural circuitry promoting satiety, can be considered one of the main factors in the operation success. This aspect can be investigated trough computational modelling based on the mechanical properties of stomach tissues and structure. Mechanical tests on gastric tissues and structure from people with obesity are carried out, as basis for the development of a computational model. The samples are obtained from stomach residuals explanted during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy interventions. Uniaxial tensile and stress relaxation tests are performed in different directions and inflation tests are carried out on the entire stomach residual. Experimental results show anisotropic, non-linear elastic and time-dependent behavior. In addition, the mechanical properties demonstrate to be dependent on the sample location within the stomach. Inflation tests confirm the characteristics of time-dependence and non-linear elasticity of the stomach wall. Experimental activities developed provide a unique set of data about the mechanical behavior of the stomach of patients with obesity, considering both tissues and structure. This data set can be adopted for the development of computational models of the stomach, as support to the rational investigation of biomechanical aspects of bariatric surgery.

Biomechanics of stomach tissues and structure in patients with obesity

Carniel E. L.;Fontanella C. G.;Pavan P. G.;Todros S.;Toniolo I.;Foletto M.
2020

Abstract

Even though bariatric surgery is one of the most effective treatment option of obesity, post-surgical weight loss is not always ensured, especially in the long term, when many patients experience weight regain. Bariatric procedures are largely based on surgeon's expertise and intra-operative decisions, while an integrated in-silico approach could support surgical activity. The effects of bariatric surgery on gastric distension, which activates the neural circuitry promoting satiety, can be considered one of the main factors in the operation success. This aspect can be investigated trough computational modelling based on the mechanical properties of stomach tissues and structure. Mechanical tests on gastric tissues and structure from people with obesity are carried out, as basis for the development of a computational model. The samples are obtained from stomach residuals explanted during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy interventions. Uniaxial tensile and stress relaxation tests are performed in different directions and inflation tests are carried out on the entire stomach residual. Experimental results show anisotropic, non-linear elastic and time-dependent behavior. In addition, the mechanical properties demonstrate to be dependent on the sample location within the stomach. Inflation tests confirm the characteristics of time-dependence and non-linear elasticity of the stomach wall. Experimental activities developed provide a unique set of data about the mechanical behavior of the stomach of patients with obesity, considering both tissues and structure. This data set can be adopted for the development of computational models of the stomach, as support to the rational investigation of biomechanical aspects of bariatric surgery.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3342931
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