Purpose: Kidney transplantation is the gold-standard treatment for end stage renal disease. Although different hemodynamic variables, like central venous pressure and mean arterial pressure, have been used to guide volume replacement during surgery, the best strategy still ought to be determined. Respiratory arterial Pulse Pressure Variation (PPV) is recognized to be a good predictor of fluid responsiveness for perioperative hemodynamic optimization in operating room settings. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a PPV-guided fluid management strategy is better than a liberal fluid strategy during kidney transplantation surgeries. Identification of differences in urine output in the first postoperative hour was the main objective of this study. Methods: We conducted a prospective, single blind, randomized controlled trial. We enrolled 40 patients who underwent kidney transplantation from deceased donors. Patients randomized in the PPV Group received fluids whenever PPV was higher than 12%, patients in the Free Fluid Group received fluids following our institutional standard care protocol for kidney transplantations (10 mL.kg-1.h-1). Results: Urinary output was similar at every time-point between the two groups, urea was statistically different from the third postoperative day with a peak at the fourth postoperative day and creatinine showed a similar trend, being statistically different from the second postoperative day. Urea, creatinine and urine output were not different at the hospital discharge. Conclusion: PPV-guided fluid therapy during kidney transplantation significantly improves urea and creatinine levels in the first week after kidney transplantation surgery.

Pulse pressure variation guided fluid therapy during kidney transplantation: a randomized controlled trial

De Cassai A.;Bond O.;Marini S.;Panciera G.;Furian L.;Neri F.;Andreatta G.;Rigotti P.;
2020

Abstract

Purpose: Kidney transplantation is the gold-standard treatment for end stage renal disease. Although different hemodynamic variables, like central venous pressure and mean arterial pressure, have been used to guide volume replacement during surgery, the best strategy still ought to be determined. Respiratory arterial Pulse Pressure Variation (PPV) is recognized to be a good predictor of fluid responsiveness for perioperative hemodynamic optimization in operating room settings. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a PPV-guided fluid management strategy is better than a liberal fluid strategy during kidney transplantation surgeries. Identification of differences in urine output in the first postoperative hour was the main objective of this study. Methods: We conducted a prospective, single blind, randomized controlled trial. We enrolled 40 patients who underwent kidney transplantation from deceased donors. Patients randomized in the PPV Group received fluids whenever PPV was higher than 12%, patients in the Free Fluid Group received fluids following our institutional standard care protocol for kidney transplantations (10 mL.kg-1.h-1). Results: Urinary output was similar at every time-point between the two groups, urea was statistically different from the third postoperative day with a peak at the fourth postoperative day and creatinine showed a similar trend, being statistically different from the second postoperative day. Urea, creatinine and urine output were not different at the hospital discharge. Conclusion: PPV-guided fluid therapy during kidney transplantation significantly improves urea and creatinine levels in the first week after kidney transplantation surgery.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3343719
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 3
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 4
social impact