Background: Upper arm lift is a widespread body contouring procedure, but no globally accepted guidelines exist in selecting patients and, due to comorbidity and heterogeneity of them, it is difficult to identify predictive factors of good surgical outcome. The authors review the team’s experience of 56 brachioplasty performed in massive weighs loss patients. Methods: Data of 56 consecutive arm lifts were reviewed for preoperative, perioperative and postoperative variables and outcomes (complications, scarring, wound healing, revision surgery, need for blood transfusion, satisfaction, etc.). Surgical technique and postoperative care are described. A statistical analysis was performed to identify relationship between possible predictive factors and outcomes. Furthermore, an evaluation of different employed wound management devices was conducted. Results: Follow-up ranged from 6 to 36 months (mean 20.1 months). Outcomes summary is reported (overall complication rate 50%, poor scarring rate 25%, delayed wound healing rate 26.8%, revision surgery rate 37.5%, need for blood transfusion rate 8.9%, satisfaction rate 71.4%) and statistical investigation evidenced the role of prior plastic surgery BMI and the associated change in BMI before and after weight loss, just prior brachioplasty, and the modality of weight loss. Conclusion: The authors’ technique resulted in positive outcomes overall, considering the difficulty in dealing with the problems of MWL patients. Based on our results, we aim to suggest to perform brachioplasty in patient with the lower achievable BMI (preferably <30kg/m2) to reduce the negative effect of unmodifiable factors as diabetes, modality of weight loss, a wide ΔBMI, and other well-known negative predictive factors.

Retrospective analysis of the predictive factors associated with good surgical outcome in brachioplasty in massive weight loss patients

Marchica P.;Bassetto F.;Raimondi A. M.;Gardener C.;Grigatti M.;Vindigni V.
2020

Abstract

Background: Upper arm lift is a widespread body contouring procedure, but no globally accepted guidelines exist in selecting patients and, due to comorbidity and heterogeneity of them, it is difficult to identify predictive factors of good surgical outcome. The authors review the team’s experience of 56 brachioplasty performed in massive weighs loss patients. Methods: Data of 56 consecutive arm lifts were reviewed for preoperative, perioperative and postoperative variables and outcomes (complications, scarring, wound healing, revision surgery, need for blood transfusion, satisfaction, etc.). Surgical technique and postoperative care are described. A statistical analysis was performed to identify relationship between possible predictive factors and outcomes. Furthermore, an evaluation of different employed wound management devices was conducted. Results: Follow-up ranged from 6 to 36 months (mean 20.1 months). Outcomes summary is reported (overall complication rate 50%, poor scarring rate 25%, delayed wound healing rate 26.8%, revision surgery rate 37.5%, need for blood transfusion rate 8.9%, satisfaction rate 71.4%) and statistical investigation evidenced the role of prior plastic surgery BMI and the associated change in BMI before and after weight loss, just prior brachioplasty, and the modality of weight loss. Conclusion: The authors’ technique resulted in positive outcomes overall, considering the difficulty in dealing with the problems of MWL patients. Based on our results, we aim to suggest to perform brachioplasty in patient with the lower achievable BMI (preferably <30kg/m2) to reduce the negative effect of unmodifiable factors as diabetes, modality of weight loss, a wide ΔBMI, and other well-known negative predictive factors.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3350776
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