Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a severe subtype of hemorrhagic stroke, and deep-vein thrombosis is a frequent complication detected in these patients. In addition to other well-established risk factors, the early activation of coagulation systems present in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage could potentially play a role in the incidence of deep-vein thrombosis. This study aims to identify possible predictors for deep-vein thrombosis related to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study on patients with a diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage who presented to our institution between 1 January 2014 and 1 August 2018. We reviewed electronic medical records and analyzed several parameters such as Fisher scale, World Federation of Neurosurgical Surgeons scale, aneurysm site, surgical or endovascular treatment, decompressive craniectomy, vasospasm, infection (meningitis and pneumonia), presence of motor deficit, length of stay in the ICU, length of hospital stay, number of days under ventilator support, d-dimer at hospitalization, and the time to thromboprophylaxis (days). Results: The univariate analysis showed that intraparenchymal cerebral hemorrhage, d-dimer at hospitalization, the time to thromboprophylaxis, motor deficit, and aneurysm located at the internal carotid artery were statistically significant factors. Intraparenchymal cerebral hemorrhage (OR 2,78 95%CI 1.07–7.12), motor deficit (OR 3.46; 95%CI 1.37–9.31), and d-dimer at hospitalization (OR 1.002 95% CI 1.001–1.003) were demonstrated as independent risk factors for deep-vein thrombosis. Length of hospital stay was also found to be significantly longer in patients who developed deep-vein thrombosis (p value 0.018). Conclusion: Elevated d-dimer level at the time of hospitalization, motor deficit, and the presence of an intraparenchymal hemorrhage are independent risk factors for deep-vein thrombosis. Patients with DVT also had a significantly longer hospital stay. Even though further studies are needed, patients with elevated d-dimer at hospitalization and intraparenchymal cerebral hemorrhage may benefit from a more aggressive screening strategy for deep-vein thrombosis.

Predictors of deep-vein thrombosis in subarachnoid hemorrhage: a retrospective analysis

Correale C.;Andreatta G.;Navalesi P.;Munari M.
2020

Abstract

Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a severe subtype of hemorrhagic stroke, and deep-vein thrombosis is a frequent complication detected in these patients. In addition to other well-established risk factors, the early activation of coagulation systems present in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage could potentially play a role in the incidence of deep-vein thrombosis. This study aims to identify possible predictors for deep-vein thrombosis related to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study on patients with a diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage who presented to our institution between 1 January 2014 and 1 August 2018. We reviewed electronic medical records and analyzed several parameters such as Fisher scale, World Federation of Neurosurgical Surgeons scale, aneurysm site, surgical or endovascular treatment, decompressive craniectomy, vasospasm, infection (meningitis and pneumonia), presence of motor deficit, length of stay in the ICU, length of hospital stay, number of days under ventilator support, d-dimer at hospitalization, and the time to thromboprophylaxis (days). Results: The univariate analysis showed that intraparenchymal cerebral hemorrhage, d-dimer at hospitalization, the time to thromboprophylaxis, motor deficit, and aneurysm located at the internal carotid artery were statistically significant factors. Intraparenchymal cerebral hemorrhage (OR 2,78 95%CI 1.07–7.12), motor deficit (OR 3.46; 95%CI 1.37–9.31), and d-dimer at hospitalization (OR 1.002 95% CI 1.001–1.003) were demonstrated as independent risk factors for deep-vein thrombosis. Length of hospital stay was also found to be significantly longer in patients who developed deep-vein thrombosis (p value 0.018). Conclusion: Elevated d-dimer level at the time of hospitalization, motor deficit, and the presence of an intraparenchymal hemorrhage are independent risk factors for deep-vein thrombosis. Patients with DVT also had a significantly longer hospital stay. Even though further studies are needed, patients with elevated d-dimer at hospitalization and intraparenchymal cerebral hemorrhage may benefit from a more aggressive screening strategy for deep-vein thrombosis.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3351106
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 3
social impact