Aims:Doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is a lethal pathology characterized by oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and contractile impairment, leading to cell death. Although extensive research has been done to understand the pathophysiology of doxorubicin cardiomyopathy, no effective treatments are available. We investigated whether monoamine oxidases (MAOs) could be involved in doxorubicin-derived oxidative stress, and in the consequent mitochondrial, cardiomyocyte, and cardiac dysfunction. Results:We used neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) and adult mouse ventricular myocytes (AMVMs). Doxorubicin alone (i.e., 0.5 mu Mdoxorubicin) or in combination with H(2)O(2)induced an increase in mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was prevented by the pharmacological inhibition of MAOs in both NRVMs and AMVMs. The pharmacological approach was supported by the genetic ablation of MAO-A in NRVMs. In addition, doxorubicin-derived ROS caused lipid peroxidation and alterations in mitochondrial function (i.e., mitochondrial membrane potential, permeability transition, redox potential), mitochondrial morphology (i.e., mitochondrial distribution and perimeter), sarcomere organization, intracellular [Ca2+] homeostasis, and eventually cell death. All these dysfunctions were abolished by MAO inhibition. Of note,in vivoMAO inhibition prevented chamber dilation and cardiac dysfunction in doxorubicin-treated mice. Innovation and Conclusion:This study demonstrates that the severe oxidative stress induced by doxorubicin requires the involvement of MAOs, which modulate mitochondrial ROS generation. MAO inhibition provides evidence that mitochondrial ROS formation is causally linked to all disorders caused by doxorubicinin vitroandin vivo. Based upon these results, MAO inhibition represents a novel therapeutic approach for doxorubicin cardiomyopathy.

The Determining Role of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Monoamine Oxidase Activity in Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity

Antonucci, Salvatore;Di Sante, Moises;Tonolo, Federica;Pontarollo, Laura;Scalcon, Valeria;Alanova, Petra;Bindoli, Alberto;Rigobello, Maria Pia;Giorgio, Marco;Kaludercic, Nina;Di Lisa, Fabio
2020

Abstract

Aims:Doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is a lethal pathology characterized by oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and contractile impairment, leading to cell death. Although extensive research has been done to understand the pathophysiology of doxorubicin cardiomyopathy, no effective treatments are available. We investigated whether monoamine oxidases (MAOs) could be involved in doxorubicin-derived oxidative stress, and in the consequent mitochondrial, cardiomyocyte, and cardiac dysfunction. Results:We used neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) and adult mouse ventricular myocytes (AMVMs). Doxorubicin alone (i.e., 0.5 mu Mdoxorubicin) or in combination with H(2)O(2)induced an increase in mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was prevented by the pharmacological inhibition of MAOs in both NRVMs and AMVMs. The pharmacological approach was supported by the genetic ablation of MAO-A in NRVMs. In addition, doxorubicin-derived ROS caused lipid peroxidation and alterations in mitochondrial function (i.e., mitochondrial membrane potential, permeability transition, redox potential), mitochondrial morphology (i.e., mitochondrial distribution and perimeter), sarcomere organization, intracellular [Ca2+] homeostasis, and eventually cell death. All these dysfunctions were abolished by MAO inhibition. Of note,in vivoMAO inhibition prevented chamber dilation and cardiac dysfunction in doxorubicin-treated mice. Innovation and Conclusion:This study demonstrates that the severe oxidative stress induced by doxorubicin requires the involvement of MAOs, which modulate mitochondrial ROS generation. MAO inhibition provides evidence that mitochondrial ROS formation is causally linked to all disorders caused by doxorubicinin vitroandin vivo. Based upon these results, MAO inhibition represents a novel therapeutic approach for doxorubicin cardiomyopathy.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3352039
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