Background: Effective stroke prevention in sickle cell disease (SCD) is recommended for children with sickle cell anaemia. Effective implementation relies on the correct stratification of stroke risk using Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound (TCD), prior to committing children to long-term treatment with transfusion. Nevertheless, less than 50% of children with SCD in Europe receive annual TCD-one of the reasons being a lack of trained personnel. The present European multi-centre study was designed to promote the standardisation and delivery of effective screening. Methods: Fifty-five practitioners from differing professional backgrounds were recruited to the TCD training program. The impact of the training programme was evaluated in three European haematology clinics by comparing stroke risk classification and middle cerebral artery time-averaged maximum velocity (TAMMV) obtained from a cohort of 555 patients, before and after training. Results: 42% (23/55) of trainees successfully completed the program. The TAMMV, used to predict stroke risk at each Centre, demonstrated the highest values in Centre 3 (p < 0.0001) before training. The imaging-TCD TAMMV was also higher in Centre 3 (p < 0.001). Following training, the TAMMV showed closer agreement between centres for both imaging-TCD and non-imaging TCD. The stroke risk distribution of children at each centre varied significantly before training (p < 0.001), but improved after training (Fisher's Exact: no treatment = 5.6, p = 0.41, treatment = 13.8, p < 0.01). The same consistency in stroke risk distribution following training was demonstrated with both non-imaging and imaging-TCD data. Conclusion: The attainment of competency in stroke screening using transcranial Doppler scanning (TCD) in sickle cell disease is more feasible for professionals with an ultrasound imaging background. A quality assurance (QA) system is required to ensure that standards are maintained. Further work is in progress to develop an achievable and reproducible QA program.

An Educational Study Promoting the Delivery of Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound Screening in Paediatric Sickle Cell Disease: A European Multi-Centre Perspective

Sainati, Laura
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Colombatti, Raffaella
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2020

Abstract

Background: Effective stroke prevention in sickle cell disease (SCD) is recommended for children with sickle cell anaemia. Effective implementation relies on the correct stratification of stroke risk using Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound (TCD), prior to committing children to long-term treatment with transfusion. Nevertheless, less than 50% of children with SCD in Europe receive annual TCD-one of the reasons being a lack of trained personnel. The present European multi-centre study was designed to promote the standardisation and delivery of effective screening. Methods: Fifty-five practitioners from differing professional backgrounds were recruited to the TCD training program. The impact of the training programme was evaluated in three European haematology clinics by comparing stroke risk classification and middle cerebral artery time-averaged maximum velocity (TAMMV) obtained from a cohort of 555 patients, before and after training. Results: 42% (23/55) of trainees successfully completed the program. The TAMMV, used to predict stroke risk at each Centre, demonstrated the highest values in Centre 3 (p < 0.0001) before training. The imaging-TCD TAMMV was also higher in Centre 3 (p < 0.001). Following training, the TAMMV showed closer agreement between centres for both imaging-TCD and non-imaging TCD. The stroke risk distribution of children at each centre varied significantly before training (p < 0.001), but improved after training (Fisher's Exact: no treatment = 5.6, p = 0.41, treatment = 13.8, p < 0.01). The same consistency in stroke risk distribution following training was demonstrated with both non-imaging and imaging-TCD data. Conclusion: The attainment of competency in stroke screening using transcranial Doppler scanning (TCD) in sickle cell disease is more feasible for professionals with an ultrasound imaging background. A quality assurance (QA) system is required to ensure that standards are maintained. Further work is in progress to develop an achievable and reproducible QA program.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3353242
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