Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide issue whereby a more prudent use of medications is needed, especially for those antimicrobials (AM) classified as ‘highest priority critically important antimicrobials’ (HPCIAs) which are likely contributors to the development of resistance. So far, data on antimicrobial use (AMU) in EU are mainly reported at sales level while information on real use, mostly in beef production, is poor. The most reliable indicator to measure AMU is the treatment incidence (TI100) calculated by using the Defined Daily Dose Animal (DDDA) as stated by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Although Italy ranks second among EU countries with regard to the AM sales in livestock production, data on AMU of the Italian beef production is still lacking, whereby the aim of this study was to provide information on the current scenario of AMU in Italian beef cattle. Data were collected from January 2016 to April 2019 from specialized beef fattening farms located in the north of Italy yielding a final dataset of 1376 batches. Data on performance and AM agents used in the study were collected and TI100 indexes per batch were calculated according to both Italian and EMA's DDDA. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to check for differences between years and seasons. Results showed a significant variation between years and seasons with a reduction of TI100 based on Italian DDDA as time progressed (P < 0.05). However, about 40% of the total amount of treatments administered were HPCIAs with macrolides accounting for the 27.7% of the total amount. The most common reasons of administration of AM were respiratory diseases (68.9%) and lameness (17.6%). Penicillins was the class of AM used on the highest proportion of batches (84.4%) showing that broad-spectrum AM were widely exploited among herds. In summary, despite a general reduction of AMU in beef cattle over time, a great use of HPCIAs was still observed suggesting that AM stewardship for Italian beef production should pay particular emphasis on the reduction of HPCIAs use. This shows how overall knowledge on where efforts need to be optimized is important to develop targeted strategies for a more responsible AM stewardship. Results of the current study may also contribute to define national and EU benchmark criteria for AMU, as a comparison with studies carried out in other countries or on other food-producing sectors is still challenging to achieve.

Use of antimicrobials in beef cattle: an observational study in the north of Italy

Diana A.;Santinello M.;Penasa M.;De Marchi M.
2020

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide issue whereby a more prudent use of medications is needed, especially for those antimicrobials (AM) classified as ‘highest priority critically important antimicrobials’ (HPCIAs) which are likely contributors to the development of resistance. So far, data on antimicrobial use (AMU) in EU are mainly reported at sales level while information on real use, mostly in beef production, is poor. The most reliable indicator to measure AMU is the treatment incidence (TI100) calculated by using the Defined Daily Dose Animal (DDDA) as stated by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Although Italy ranks second among EU countries with regard to the AM sales in livestock production, data on AMU of the Italian beef production is still lacking, whereby the aim of this study was to provide information on the current scenario of AMU in Italian beef cattle. Data were collected from January 2016 to April 2019 from specialized beef fattening farms located in the north of Italy yielding a final dataset of 1376 batches. Data on performance and AM agents used in the study were collected and TI100 indexes per batch were calculated according to both Italian and EMA's DDDA. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to check for differences between years and seasons. Results showed a significant variation between years and seasons with a reduction of TI100 based on Italian DDDA as time progressed (P < 0.05). However, about 40% of the total amount of treatments administered were HPCIAs with macrolides accounting for the 27.7% of the total amount. The most common reasons of administration of AM were respiratory diseases (68.9%) and lameness (17.6%). Penicillins was the class of AM used on the highest proportion of batches (84.4%) showing that broad-spectrum AM were widely exploited among herds. In summary, despite a general reduction of AMU in beef cattle over time, a great use of HPCIAs was still observed suggesting that AM stewardship for Italian beef production should pay particular emphasis on the reduction of HPCIAs use. This shows how overall knowledge on where efforts need to be optimized is important to develop targeted strategies for a more responsible AM stewardship. Results of the current study may also contribute to define national and EU benchmark criteria for AMU, as a comparison with studies carried out in other countries or on other food-producing sectors is still challenging to achieve.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3353488
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